Soares dos Reis National Museum

Porto, Portugal

Soares dos Reis National Museum is the first Portuguese national museum exhibiting collections of Portuguese art, including a collection by Portuguese sculptor António Soares dos Reis, from which the museum derives its name.

The museum was founded in 1833 as Museum Portuense by King Peter IV. Initially it was housed in the Convent of Santo António (in the centre of Porto), exhibiting religious art confiscated from Portuguese convents, and those works of art expropriated from the absolutist followers of Miguel I (who had struggled against Peter IV a year before).

During the 19th century the museum made several acquisitions that were integrated into the main collection.

But, it was in 1911 that the museum obtained its collection of work by Soares dos Reis, a celebrated Portuense sculptor, taking on the name of its benefactor.

In 1942 the museum was transferred from the centre of the city to the former-residence of the Moraes e Castro family, known commonly as the Carrancas (which means scowlers/frowners, a passing reference to the disapproving nature of its members). The large building provided the spaces and conditions to store and exhibit the collections. Over time, the spaces were expanded and modernised under a project by architect Fernando Távora.

Collections

The museum has a vast collection mainly focused on Portuguese art of the 19th and 20th centuries, including painting, sculpture, furniture, metalwork and ceramics.

Artists represented include painters Domingos Sequeira, Vieira Portuense, Augusto Roquemont, Miguel Ângelo Lupi, António Carvalho de Silva Porto, Marques de Oliveira, Henrique Pousão, Aurélia de Souza, Dórdio Gomes, Júlio Resende and sculptors Soares do Reis, Augusto Santo, António Teixeira Lopes, Rodolfo Pinto do Couto and many others.

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Details

Founded: 1833
Category: Museums in Portugal

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

kamal farhadi (18 months ago)
Very nice exhibition of diferent painters, the ceramic collection and jewelary were excellent.
Stavros Gennitsaris (18 months ago)
If you are interested in art, this is a museum that you must visit in Porto. You will find paintings, sculptures, glass art and furniture. The museum also hosts interesting permanent exhibitions. The majority of the paintings are naturalist. The admission fee is reasonable (normal is 5€ and reduced is 2.5€). It will take you about 2 hours. After your visit, try the cafe of the museum. It has nice coffee and food in very good prices.
Christoph Knote (18 months ago)
Super boring. No English explanations. Dark illuminations. Not much context. 5€ entrance fee (2.5€ for students etc.)
Brenda Coyle (19 months ago)
Full of old Portuguese masters if you like that sort of thing, building lacks any character, dull and lifeless, really in need of new artistic management, but I was fortunate to stumble upon a few beautiful contemporary pieces one being a short film (hidden in some odd gallery) by the artist William Forsythe. I was mesmerised by his piece titled Aligningung 2. For that alone (and for that someone who decided to place this in this gallery) I give it 5 stars.
Pedro Cruz (20 months ago)
Very nice museum, especially if you like 19 centiry painting
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