João Baptista da Foz Fortress

Porto, Portugal

The Fortress San João Baptista da Foz do Douro was built in the late sixteenth century to better protect the coast and the mouth of the Douro River. The monument is occupied today by the Regional Delegation of the Institute of National Defense. It is a fine example of military architecture. The original basic structure was enhanced with more recent bulwarks. The Lawn Tennis Club da Foz is located at the foot of the Fort.

Visits to the Fort are free on weekdays between 9h and 17h30. There are no official guided tours, but if you are part of a large group, it is advisable to contact the Fort ahead of time to ensure that the visit does not disturb its activities.

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Details

Founded: 1570
Category: Castles and fortifications in Portugal

More Information

www.helloguideoporto.com

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dan Myles (16 months ago)
I didn't go inside so cannot comment on that. Outside was nice but needs some cleaning up of debris.
Jordana Gold (18 months ago)
Pretty views but not much to see or do.
Piotr Zwarycz (2 years ago)
Place worth to see when you are in Lisbon. Nice to walk straight the ocean and come back by public bus.
David Tran (2 years ago)
Impressive waves here. Would have been a surfer's paradise, although maybe the fact that they are cordoned off says that it is probably too dangerous to surf. Got some really good pictures though. Definitely worth a visit. Bus route 500 will get you there and back
Joe Wyatt (2 years ago)
Great view of the mouth of the Douro River. I understand why they chose the location for the fortress. You can see in all directions. Panoramic views of the coast are truly breathtaking.
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