Klingnau Castle

Klingnau, Switzerland

The construction of the Klingnau castle, originally the seat of the Klingen family, was started in 1240. Until 1269 a manor house stood on the grounds. After 1331 the outer walls were added. In the second half of the 14th century the Bishop of Constance was often a resident in the castle. He ordered further improvements and expansions.

In the late 16th century, the castle, which was the seat of the bailiff from Constance, in such bad condition that the Swiss Confederation demanded a renovation from the bishop. In 1804 the castle went to the newly formed Canton of Aargau, who auctioned it off in 1817. As a result it has been used by various industries, until the 20th century when it was taken over by a foundation.

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Details

Founded: 1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monika Fischer (4 months ago)
Was there at carnival
Dietmar Lipe (7 months ago)
Stylish place to celebrate
Nadja Loetscher (8 months ago)
Nice castle. Was at an aperitif at a wedding.
Anne Glüxpilz (11 months ago)
Great location for weddings etc
Adrian Knecht (15 months ago)
Beautiful location. The knight's hall is beautifully renovated and nicely furnished. There is a fully equipped kitchen on site.
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