The construction of the Klingnau castle, originally the seat of the Klingen family, was started in 1240. Until 1269 a manor house stood on the grounds. After 1331 the outer walls were added. In the second half of the 14th century the Bishop of Constance was often a resident in the castle. He ordered further improvements and expansions.

In the late 16th century, the castle, which was the seat of the bailiff from Constance, in such bad condition that the Swiss Confederation demanded a renovation from the bishop. In 1804 the castle went to the newly formed Canton of Aargau, who auctioned it off in 1817. As a result it has been used by various industries, until the 20th century when it was taken over by a foundation.

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Founded: 1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

L DC (10 months ago)
Wunderschön
J Khan (2 years ago)
Sehr schöner Ort zum Feiern
Alexander Volmar (2 years ago)
Vorteil: großer Vorplatz ideal zum Party machen
Patrik Keller (3 years ago)
Nice ancient place with historic background in Klingnau.
Andreas Laeubli (3 years ago)
Wir waren hier für eine Hochzeit. Sehr gut unterhalten. Mit Küche und Sanitäreneinrichtungen. Toller Schlosshof mit Aussicht. Sehr geeignet für Aperos.
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