Predigerkirche is one of the four main churches of the old town of Zürich. First built in 1231 as a Romanesque church of the then Dominican Predigerkloster, the Basilica was converted in the first half of the 14th century, the choir between 1308 and 1350 rebuilt, and an for that time unusual high bell tower was built, regarded as most high Gothic edifice in Zürich.

The abbey-choir building had been used for secular purposes since the 16th century Protestant Reformation, and was transformed by the installation of shelves into a warehouse building. For several centuries it was used as a granary. Since 1914 the choir building has been administrated by the Zentralbibliothek (Zürich central library), the main library of both the canton, city and the University of Zürich.

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Founded: 1231
Category: Religious sites in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Major Topkek (22 months ago)
Yo it's tarnation lit init. Chilling with the big man n stuff.
Lance Houser (2 years ago)
Vespers service featured Bach. Excellent choir, tenor, alto and strings plus clarinet. Wonderful!!
Salim Al Mashrafi (2 years ago)
It fantastic and old church. The building is standing with honor since ver very long time. The architectural touches and design are amazing.
Philippe Jacques Kradolfer (2 years ago)
The "Predigerkirche" in Zurich is an import architectural building dating back to the 13th. Century. With a beautiful exterior and a simple and austere interior is a must visit while in Zurich. It is currently used as a cultural hall.
Heman Patel (2 years ago)
Amazing church. We went during the Christmas period, so it can be busy with all the stalls outside.
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