Torre d'en Galmés Talayotic Settlement

Alaior, Spain

Torre d’en Galmés is the largest settlement in Menorca. Its hilltop location made it the ideal spot for keeping watch over the land on most of the island's south coast. In chronological terms, it was occupied from the Naviforme period (1700-1400 BCE), and you can still see an underground chamber from this period near the area where water was collected, right through until the late Roman era, although some remains have been found from the Islamic era (12th century AD). 

The site consists of a public area, with three talaiots (1000-700 BCE) standing on top of the hill, plus the taula enclosure next to the middle talaiot, dating from the post-Talayotic period (650-123 BCE). The capital of this taula was re-used as a tombstone in the late Roman or medieval period. An archaeological dig carried out in 1974 unearthed a bronze Egyptian figure of the god Imhotep, now displayed in the Museum of Menorca together with other ritual objects found on the site. The figure was most likely acquired between the 4th and 3rd centuries BCE.

On the south side of the hill are circular houses from the same period, with rooms separated by radial walls that converge on a central patio area with a water tank. On the side of each house are outbuildings that were used as storerooms or larders, and that still preserve the stone roofing slabs supported by pillars. The largest house is the one known as the “Círculo Cartailhac”, dating from the 2nd century B.C. and excavated in 2008. There is also a rainwater catchment system formed by cisterns or tanks of different sizes carved out of the rock. The whole settlement was probably enclosed by a perimeter wall that connected the houses to each other following an irregular layout.

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Details

Founded: 1700 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Myrddin James (5 months ago)
Amazing history of the islands and very friendly local guide assistance
Jeremy Walton (5 months ago)
Fantastically curated outdoor museum of ancient Talaiotic culture
Gael Frazier (6 months ago)
An impressive site with very old house type in stone. It's free for all on Monday. Can be pretty hot even if there are many olive trees. Several caves can be visited, sometime just follow the tracks. Many informations are available close to each structures.
Lance Concannon (8 months ago)
Amazing historical site - well worth spending an afternoon exploring. Much larger than I expected.
Freddy de Bree (8 months ago)
Incredible, impressive, enormous complex of Talayotic structures, basically houses of large stones and incredible construction. Unbelievable how sophisticated this all was for so many years BC with so little tools as it seems. Be prepared to bring sun cream and hat on sunny days, most of it is out in the open field. There is a parking lot for about 15 cars (estimate). Lots to walk and lots to explore for kids as well (find the holes, caves and houses and pointing arrows).
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