So na Caçana

Alaior, Spain

So na Caçana dates from the Talayotic period (1000-700 B.C.) and remained occupied until the arrival of the Romans. It contains up to ten large structures. At first it was thought to be a settlement but archaeological excavation work uncovered up to three taula enclosures, which suggested it was more likely to have been a sanctuary and ceremonial site that may have been used by more than one community.The main features of the site are the central monument, the entrance to which was closed off in the 1st century B.C., and the taula enclosure on the west side. The capital of the taula has not survived, but you can see an unusual pilaster at the back. Also of interest are the niches in the perimeter wall. Archaeological excavation work inside the enclosure has uncovered evidence of the rituals carried out in this type of enclosure. There is also a necropolis in the area, comprising two natural caves and three underground burial chambers.

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Details

Founded: 1000-700 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Domingo Llull (2 years ago)
Un espacio con muchos restos arqueologicos desde donde se divisa la vecina isla de Msllorca. Recomendable es esta visita.
Jamie Hay (2 years ago)
Excellent ruins to wander around, in a nice rural setting.
Martí Carbonell (3 years ago)
El jaciment de So na Caçana és considerat com un conjunt de santuaris, ja que molts dels recintes documentats en aquest indret tenen una tipologia arquitectònica que així ho fa pensar als investigadors. Per tant, podria tractar-se d’un centre religiós vinculat als nuclis de població d’aquesta zona de l’illa. També hi ha una necròpolis formada per dues coves naturals retocades per l’home i tres hipogeus. El seu origen es situa en el Bronze Mitjà i és ocupat fins l’època romana, com ho demostren restes arqueològiques trobades en alguns dels seus monuments.
Chris Lloyd (4 years ago)
Very interesting place and really worth a visit if passing.
brendan cochrane (4 years ago)
Magical and mysterious!
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