So na Caçana

Alaior, Spain

So na Caçana dates from the Talayotic period (1000-700 B.C.) and remained occupied until the arrival of the Romans. It contains up to ten large structures. At first it was thought to be a settlement but archaeological excavation work uncovered up to three taula enclosures, which suggested it was more likely to have been a sanctuary and ceremonial site that may have been used by more than one community.The main features of the site are the central monument, the entrance to which was closed off in the 1st century B.C., and the taula enclosure on the west side. The capital of the taula has not survived, but you can see an unusual pilaster at the back. Also of interest are the niches in the perimeter wall. Archaeological excavation work inside the enclosure has uncovered evidence of the rituals carried out in this type of enclosure. There is also a necropolis in the area, comprising two natural caves and three underground burial chambers.

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Details

Founded: 1000-700 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sri N (2 years ago)
It's a hidden gem and it is free to visit. It is one of the Talayotic settlements, with oven , diety and ceremonial fire place . It is also at the one the highest points and you can learn about the stones that were brought to build from 3km away. Very calm and interesting place with no crowd
jaqsbcn (3 years ago)
Small archeological area,recommended if you have time.
Catherine Carlton (4 years ago)
Beautiful and interesting
Tiago Schiappa (5 years ago)
Amazing place!! Really cool, go there without doubt
Domingo Llull (5 years ago)
Un espacio con muchos restos arqueologicos desde donde se divisa la vecina isla de Msllorca. Recomendable es esta visita.
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