Talatí de Dalt

Mahón, Spain

Talatí de Dalt is one of the Menorca's most significant prehistoric settlements. It consists of various monuments: an elliptical-shaped conical talaiot, a taula enclosure, an area with dwellings and some caves.The taula enclosure at Talatí de Dalt is one of the largest and most beautiful in Menorca. It has an unusual aspec, as the pillar and its capital are leaning against the side edge of the centre T, probably because they fell over accidentally. In the 1960s, an archaeological dig documented the characteristic objects used in the rituals held at these sites in the post-Talayotic period (650-123 B.C.), including evidence of fire, the remains of the bones of lambs and kid goats, plus amphorae for wine.

Another distinctive feature of the settlement is the collection of houses belonging to the same period whic still retain, their stone roof slabs pointing towards the centre and supported by pillars. The dwellings date from the 2nd century B.C.

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Camí de Talatí, Mahón, Spain
See all sites in Mahón

Details

Founded: 850 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J. Haig (2 years ago)
People lived here! Take a slow walk around the site about an hour before sundown. It's amazing. This is very ancient history and the landowners get no subsidy or financing other than what you pay/donate at the little hut. Take your time, soak it all in and be generous with what you give...
Bradlee C (2 years ago)
Just a nice place to relax
Brad C (2 years ago)
Just a nice place to relax
Tiago Schiappa (3 years ago)
Every Poblat Talaiotic worths a visit, and this one is no execption, enjoy cuz is very good
Bob Smith (3 years ago)
4 euros is a reasonable price to pay to view this large site. I enjoyed it.
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