Torelló Talayot

Mahón, Spain

The Torelló settlement was one of the largest in the municipal area of Mahón. It is especially well known for the spectacular talaiot (called the Talayot of Torellonet Vell) which is interesting because at the top of the tower you can still see the original doorway and the lintel above it, both of which date from the Talayotic period (1000-700 BCE).

Unfortunately, the structure was damaged by the triangulation pillar and the airport-runway approach lights that were placed on the tower platform. An archaeological dig carried out on the site in the 1980s unearthed lamps dating from the period of Imperial Rome plus the remains of fine Roman pottery.Of all the structures identified in the settlement, the most interesting are a second talayot (much smaller in size); the foundations of several houses; a couple of artificial caves; plus a water catchment system made up tanks or cisterns and channels.

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Massupta Vell, Mahón, Spain
See all sites in Mahón

Details

Founded: 1000 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

User Reviews

Ale Bazzano (3 years ago)
Impresionante!
JAVIER RODRIGUEZ (3 years ago)
Lugar diferente pueblo antiguo
Ave Tena (3 years ago)
Magic
Pedro Cardona (3 years ago)
Bien conservado, bonito entorno. Sin parking para visitas.
Tomeu Pons (4 years ago)
Cercle i talaiot imponents
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