The Rafal Rubí navetas are two tombs of the same type as the Naveta des Tudons, but these are smaller and are unusual in that they are very close to one another. They are group burials with a perforated stone slab at the entrance to the inner chamber, which is split into two levels.

Of the two navetas, the east one is in better condition, as the front was restored in the late 1960s, when an archaeological dig was also carried out during which burial goods were found, including pottery items, rhomboid-shaped bronze pendants and part of a torc. The west naveta was excavated in 1977 and the human remains found in the upper chamber were dated to 904 B.C.The items found are on display in the Museum of Menorca.

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Details

Founded: 1000 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Josep Martí Lladó (2 years ago)
Aneu a descubrirla, us fascinarà.
Gergo Bognar (2 years ago)
If it's on your way it's worth to stop and check it out. Other way I would not visit it.
Francisco Gomez (2 years ago)
1)Be careful about your car, I recommend park it close to the Me1. 2)if the door is closed,remove the chain, it is unlocked, but remember to close the door. 3) it is a private property but you can access to see the monuments. Please keep it clean and neat. 4)enjoy the visit. Rarely hidden away, you will often glimpse them unexpectedly from the roadside, perhaps in the middle of a field, surrounded by feeding animals. These are the remains of the late-Bronze-Age Talaiot culture. Due to their abundance Menorca is often referred to as the mediteranen's largest open air museum. Settlements can be traced back to the Bronze Age, 2000 B.C. There were little or no building materials on the island besides stone so people took adavantge of the soft rock and took shelter inside it ( caves ) or under stone roofs. Pre-history, art was represented in mysterious constructions.
Oh la la! (3 years ago)
Lovely free archeological settlement
Michael Turtle (4 years ago)
Smaller than some of the other sites but easy to access and quite well maintained.
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