Castel dell'Ovo

Naples, Italy

Castel dell'Ovo (Egg Castle) is located on the former island of Megaride, now a peninsula, on the Gulf of Naples. The castle's name comes from a legend about the Roman poet Virgil, who had a reputation in the Middle Ages as a great sorcerer and predictor of the future. In the legend, Virgil put a magical egg into the foundations to support the fortifications. Had this egg been broken, the castle would have been destroyed and a series of disastrous events for Naples would have followed.

Roman Era

The Castel dell'Ovo is the oldest standing fortification in Naples. The island of Megaride was where Greek colonists from Cumae founded the original nucleus of the city in the 6th century BC. Its location affords it an excellent view of the Naples waterfront and the surrounding area. In the 1st century BC the Roman patrician Lucius Licinius Lucullus built the magnificent villa Castellum Lucullanum on the site. Fortified by Valentinian III in the mid-5th century, it was the site to which the last western Roman emperor, Romulus Augustulus, was exiled in 476. Eugippius founded a monastery on the site after 492.

Middle Ages

The remains of the Roman-era structures and later fortifications were demolished by local residents in the 9th century to prevent their use by Saracen raiders. The first castle on the site was built by the Normans in the 12th century. Roger the Norman, conquering Naples in 1140, made Castel dell 'Ovo his seat. The importance of the Castel dell'Ovo began to decline when king Charles I of Anjou built a new castle, Castel Nuovo, and moved his court there. Castel dell'Ovo became the seat of the Royal Chamber and of the State Treasury. It also served as a prison. The current appearance dates from the Aragonese domination (15th century).

Modern Age

It was struck by French and Spanish artillery during the Italian Wars; in the Neapolitan Republic of 1799 its guns were used by rebels to deter the philo-Bourbon population of the city. After a long period of decay the site got its current appearance during an extensive renovation project started in 1975.

Architecture

In the 19th century a small fishing village called Borgo Marinaro, which is still extant, developed around the castle's eastern wall. It is now known for its marina and restaurants. The castle is rectangular in plan, approximately 200 by 45 metres at its widest, with a high bastion overlooking the causeway that connects it to the shore; the causeway is more than 100 metres long and a popular location for newlyweds to have their wedding photos taken. Inside the castle walls are several buildings that are often used for exhibitions and other special events. Behind the castle there is a long promontory once probably used as a docking area. A large round tower stands outside the castle walls to the southeast.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.castel-dell-ovo.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jessica Rayes (2 years ago)
This is such a stunning landmark in Santa Lucia! I was fortunate enough to be able to take a paddle boat out to the castle for a swim mid October. Definitely a must see when visiting Naples.
Mohamed belfakih (2 years ago)
I actually visited in October 2018. I really enjoyed my visit, even though I had seen other similar architecture. The cannons are memorable and the points from where you can see the beautiful view. The walk from the land makes it different and its history is interesting.
Marylin HR (2 years ago)
I loved it. Very nice Castell. Beautiful view and a big plus is that it's free. No entrance fee is always nice. We spent 45 min. in the Castell to take in the view. If you're visiting during Covid, you have to register beforehand. I would recommend to do it one or two days in advance, since I noticed that some people didn't get in, when the registered there in the moment.
Anna Cortez (2 years ago)
Very crowded and loud, but still pretty. Now, during the Corona virus pandemic the castle is closed, but still looks impressive from the outside. Locals love to hang out in front of the castle and there are many trendy bars and restaurants just around the corner. Nice views of the sea and bay
dan hips (2 years ago)
Really enchanting place. Free Entrance. Nice experience walking through the Walls. Nice view from the top of the castle!
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