San Domenico Maggiore

Naples, Italy

San Domenico Maggiore is a Gothic church and monastery, founded by the friars of the Dominican Order. The church incorporates a smaller, original church built on this site in the 10th century, San Michele Arcangelo a Morfisa.

Charles II of Naples began the rebuilding that produced the gothic structure that comprises the present church. The work was done between 1283 and 1324, but the church has undergone modifications over the centuries, including one in 1670 that recast some of the decoration in a Baroque style. In the 19th century, however, the church was restored to its original Gothic design.

The monastery annexed to the church has been the home of prominent names in the history of religion and philosophy. It was the original seat of the University of Naples, where Thomas Aquinas, a former member of the Dominican community there, returned to teach theology in 1272.

Artistically, the most notable feature are the frescoes by Pietro Cavallini in the Brancaccio Chapel (1309), depicting Stories of St. John the EvangelistCrucifixionStories of Magdalene and the Apostles Peter, Paul and Andrew.

The sacristy houses a series of 45 sepulchres of members of the royal Aragonese family, including that of King Ferdinand I. The remains of the Blessed Raymond of Capua, a former Master General of the Dominican Order, also rest there.

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Details

Founded: 1283-1324
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elena Koll (2 years ago)
Richly decorated, very beautiful!
Peter Walkemeyer (2 years ago)
Beautifully maintained cathedral with peaceful atmosphere
Martin Mc Mahon (2 years ago)
Either ask for a donation or charge entry. A forced donation isn't appreciated on principle.
joel vasquez villanueva (2 years ago)
This church is bigger than what it looks like. Mi piace tanto. Is in the heart of the center of Naples. Its very peaceful and the sealing is very beautiful
i pm (3 years ago)
I'd consider this a true hidden gem. Not very popular, not too touristy, yet it's a wonderful medieval church. I'd highly recommend to visit.
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