Shane's Castle is a ruined castle near Randalstown in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. The castle is on the north-east shores of Lough Neagh. Built in 1345 by a member of the O'Neill dynasty, it was originally called Eden-duff-carrick. Shane MacBrien O'Neill changed the name to Shane's Castle in 1722.

Multiple scenes of Game of Thrones series have been shot in and around the 2600-acre estate; it’s hosted the Tourney of the Hand in honor of Ned Stark, was seen to good effect when King Robert Baratheon and posse arrived at Winterfell, and served as the King’s Landing dungeons. 

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1345
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brenda McNally (16 months ago)
Steeped in history and it is a vast area to explore. They put on some fantastic family days at certain times of the year. My husband and two young boys recently visited the Steam Rally and it was fantastic .
Jonathan Gourley (16 months ago)
Visited for the steam rally. My better half, and her brother attended with me. A fabulous time was had by all. Lots of great memories from childhood. The castle ruins were also great to look around. Other half was just upset that the train has stopped running. Definitely worth a visit.
Marazan (16 months ago)
Great space with lovely views over Lough Neagh. The steam traction rally is worth a visit each May Day bank holiday with loads of steam engines, vintage cars, military vehicles and many crafts and mechanical parts stalls.
Alan Wallder (16 months ago)
Geoff Woolley (16 months ago)
We visited a Vintage Steam Rally here with vintage cars, trucks and agricultural tractors. A thoroughly enjoyable family day out and we loved every moment. A great big thank you to the organizers.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.