Glenarm Friary

Glenarm, United Kingdom

In the early fifteenth century, Franciscan Third Order Regular communities began to be established in Ireland. In 1445 the archdeacon of Connor was sent a mandate by Pope Eugenius VI, authorising him to establish a Franciscan Third Order Regular friary in his diocese.

A 1580 map of the County Antrim coastline shows the friary at ‘Glanarme’ on the other side of the river from the castle. It was probably closed by the beginning of the seventeenth century, but its site continued to be the favoured burial place of the local population, including settlers from Scotland. 

Little of the friary survives today, and what remains is not easy to interpret.  It was aligned along the traditional east-west axis, so what was once thought to have been the chancel is now believed to have been a transept.

 

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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User Reviews

Adam M (2 years ago)
This is a beautiful Victorian building with a Strawberry Gothick tower of the 1760's, set beside the ruins of a medieval friary founded in 1445. Revd Helen does a magnificent job of running the parish, and the church is often open during the day for visitors to explore it and pray.
John Dillinger (4 years ago)
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