Outside Down Cathedral on the highest part of Cathedral Hill lies the grave of Saint Patrick, the apostle of Ireland. By the early medieval period Patrick’s grave had become an important site for the developing church and an important monastery had grown around it. At this time the tradition of the hill being the burial place of saints Brigid and Columcille had been added to the legend of Patrick, giving rise to the well-known couplet: In Down, three saints one grave do fill,Patrick, Brigid and Columcille.

A massive granite stone marker was placed on Cathedral Hill in the early 1900’s to protect the grave from the many pilgrims who visited, some of whom were known to take scoops of earth from the grave abroad with them when they emigrated.

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Details

Founded: 5th century AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in United Kingdom

More Information

www.saintpatrickcentre.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matt “Matt Woods” Woods (2 years ago)
A beautiful building with fine architecture on the inside. Amazing views towards the Mournes and the surrounding countryside.
Raymond Fox (2 years ago)
Building in great order..very old. Organ sound wonderful..great welcome
Geoff Sterrett (3 years ago)
Beautiful church with interesting gift shop and help desk. Located just outside historic town of Downpatrick and associated with St Patrick. Helpful and friendly staff
Amanda Paul (3 years ago)
Fantastic friendly staff. The peace and power of God shines through this place and it's people. I was there recently and am a wheelchair user. I was treated like a queen, nothing was too much for the staff there. I would pray that I could have just a smidge of their compassion and care. May God bless you guys and all that you do there
Charles Aulbach (3 years ago)
Cathedral is Intetesting but sterile. Beautiful wooden furnishings. Helpful and friendly staff. See the grave of saint Brigid, Patrick and Columns. It is a pilgrimage, not entertainment.
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