Scrabo Tower is a lookout tower or folly built in 1857-1859. It provides wide views and forms a landmark that can be seen from far. It was built as a memorial to the 3rd Marquess of Londonderry and was originally known as Londonderry Monument. Its architecture is an example of the Scottish baronial revival style.

 

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Founded: 1857-1859
Category: Statues in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ross Mackay (18 months ago)
Some amazing views well worth the walk.
adi paul (18 months ago)
Now open for the summer Friday through to Sunday 11am-5pm, adults £3.50 Kids 5 and over £2.50 Lovely friendly staff at the entrance and the top of the tower, lots of knowledge to answer any questions and a few kids activity such as drawing half way up the tower. The country park is lovely and well worth a walk with some picnic benches just at the start of the walk to the tower.
Remigiusz (19 months ago)
Great view from the top of the hill, it would be even better if you could get to the top of the tower but it is closed.
charmaine denyssen (19 months ago)
Very beautiful views to see on a clear day a wonderful walk with the kids
Paul Carnduff (21 months ago)
It's been years since walked up to the tower. Unfortunately we arrived late so wasn't able to go in the tower looking out over newtownards and the strangled lock was magnificent. The weather was about wild but the walk up wasn't to difficult and path up well maintained. Well worth a visit
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