Audley's Castle is a three-storey tower house named after its 16th century owner, John Audley.

There are thousands of small stone towers similar to Audley's Castle in the Irish countryside. They are one of the commonest of archaeological sites, which indicates these were not buildings put up for the higher aristocracy, but for lesser lords and gentry. Most were built in the late Middle Ages (roughly 1350–1550). Audley's was built towards the end of this period.

There is very little historical information about the buildings in the small courtyard around Audley's. Only a minority of towers had courtyard walls at all, and their buildings were clearly less important than the tower. The towers in different parts of the country vary, with distinct regional patterns. Audley's with its two turrets linked by an arch is one of a type found in County Down only.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Jason Conradt (2 years ago)
Another cool stop on the GoT tour. Lovely views too bad you can't go into the castle .
Kathy Ward (2 years ago)
Great historic site,part of a fantastic walk. There are fabulous views of Strangford Lough. Great spot for a photo opportunity.
Jarrett Momberger (2 years ago)
Very pleasent and peaceful, has a great view
Matt Janaway (3 years ago)
My partner and I absolutely loved this place. We visited during a Game of Thrones tour and the views were spectacular. I highly recommend visiting. If you can, go with a tour guide. We were lucky enough to have an extra in the show as our guide, which made it extra special.
Chris Wilson (3 years ago)
A big old castle with a fantastic view. Whilst not readily accessible, requires walking through a field, it offers some truly spectacular views of the local countryside. Whilst not able to ourselves, we did hear that you are able to get into the castle during Summer afternoons.
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