Strangford Castle appears to be a small tower house from the late 16th century, but a blocked door of 15th century type at first floor level, seems to indicate the remodelling of an earlier tower. The current entrance, in the north-east wall, is a reconstruction, positioned by the surviving corbelled machicolation above and a socket from a draw-bar to secure the original door. The original entrance may have been on the first floor. It is a small, rectangular, three-storey tower house with no vault or stone stairway. The first floor fireplace has an oven. The ground floor chamber is lit only by small gun-loops. The roof has very fine crenellations, again with pistol-loops. The original floors, like their modern replacements, were made of wood.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andy Smith (2 years ago)
Great place to visit, especially if you are a Game of Thrones fan; though it is hard to relate the ruins to the series. Enjoyed the day walking around here and the main house is also nice to visit.
Steven Mullan (2 years ago)
If you enjoy walking this is a beautiful setting. We stayed in our motor home and on site the staff were so helpful. Facilities are clean.
Rebecca Noonan (2 years ago)
Fantastic experience with lovely staff, fabulous scenery and of course the grounds of Winterfell. Couldnt fault it at all. The guides are lovely. The grounds are beautifully kept. Well worth a visit. We had a great day. So much to see and do for all the family. I will return...but not too soon because Winter is Coming
Laura Mccartney (2 years ago)
This is the loveliest campsite. It's small, only 28 pitches, and extremely well placed- immediate access to Castleward estate and an easy 15 minute walk to the village of Strangford with its pubs and restaurants. It has a lovely welcoming atmosphere, down to the excellent warden and his attention to detail. Love it.
Gwen Patterson (2 years ago)
Met a very friendly girl on the gate on the way into the car park who was very helpful. Beautiful walks and wonderful views. Impressive grounds and very well kept. Would definitely recommend this as a place to explore.
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