Botkyrka Church

Botkyrka, Sweden

According the legend the first wooden church of Botkyrka was completed in 1129 and it was built by Björn to his brother St. Bodvid. It was replaced by a Romanescue-style stone church in 1176. The present main nave originates from this church. The tower was added some decades later and the church was enlarged in the 14th and 15th centuries.

The altar was made in Antwerpen in 1525. The sandstone epitaph date from the 12th century. The crucifix from the 14th century is today moved to the National Historical Museum in Stockholm.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 1176
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

rexhenrik.se

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Edvinas Griauzdė (3 months ago)
One of the most amazing buildings
Solweig löwemo (4 months ago)
Hejsan vederbörande ansvarig för gudstjänsten idag 7/10 2018. Vi, dvs min man och jag brukar med glädje ta del av Gudstjänsterna på TV eftersom vi har svårt att komma till kyrkan. För det mesta mycket glädje och sång och predikningar med innehåll. I dag blev vi besvikna eftersom man dansade i kyrkan till vissa psalmer. Vi vill ge vår åsikt om detta och tycker det är tråkigt att man gör så för det tillför inte tittarna något, bara irritation och förvåning. En sak till varför gör man om melodierna till vissa sånger och psalmer, tycker det är så ledsamt och man frågar sig varför. Sångarna sjöng bra, Ni vill ju ha recensioner. Vänligen Solweig o Lennart Löwemo
Predrag Jovanovic (7 months ago)
Obavezno pogledati...
Eva Eriksson (7 months ago)
En vacker gammal kyrka.
Britt-Marie Lundqvist (8 months ago)
Vilken otrolig vaktmästare som mötte oss vid min mors urnsättning. Tyvärr kommer jag inte ihåg hans namn. Vilket mottagande, lugn och ro, det är det man behöver vid detta tillfälle. Var rädd om honom, det är verkligen rätt man på rätt plats!
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