In the outskirts of Mtskheta are the ruins of Armaztsikhe fortress (3rd century BC). Armaztsikhe was the residence of the Kings of Iberia. This is one of the oldest cities of the Antique Era, which is not fully explored yet. It is also called like Georgian Acropolis. The Greek historian Dio Cassius mentioned this place in his book “The history of Rome”. He wrote that in 65 years BC, Roman Senator Gnaeus Pompeius invaded Iberia and reached this Acropolis too.

Archaeological investigations began in 1943 and three main cultures were identified: the oldest finds were dated to the 1st century BC to 2nd century AD, the central findings on the 3rd-5th centuries, and the latest to the 6th century. Consequently Armaztsikhe was destroyed by the Arabs in the 8th century. There are a royal sarcophagus, vestiges of the ramparts, a fortified tower and supporting pillars, foundation walls of the palace, a bath house, a wine cellar, a pre-Christian temple and a canal system.

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Founded: 300 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Georgia

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www.itinari.com

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giorgi Mirotadze (3 years ago)
Large archeological site of 1st- 5th centuries AD. This was an acropolis of the old capital of Georgia - Mtskheta. Very nice place to visit with the family, although tricky to find. Here is the hint: On the way back from Mtskheta to Tbilisi, watch out for the sign "Armazi Bagineti". As you see it, make next turn right, go up and move back parallel to the main road.
Sandro Kenkadze (3 years ago)
This place is One of the oldest place and ruins in Georgia
Gabo Gatchava (4 years ago)
Ancient place, forgotten really. go there if you are near by. It is very calm, and view is breathtaking.
Doigen (4 years ago)
An interesting site, though the authorities could invest a bit in improving the access road and maintaining the site.
Mirjana Prekovic (4 years ago)
Beautiful place
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