In the outskirts of Mtskheta are the ruins of Armaztsikhe fortress (3rd century BC). Armaztsikhe was the residence of the Kings of Iberia. This is one of the oldest cities of the Antique Era, which is not fully explored yet. It is also called like Georgian Acropolis. The Greek historian Dio Cassius mentioned this place in his book “The history of Rome”. He wrote that in 65 years BC, Roman Senator Gnaeus Pompeius invaded Iberia and reached this Acropolis too.

Archaeological investigations began in 1943 and three main cultures were identified: the oldest finds were dated to the 1st century BC to 2nd century AD, the central findings on the 3rd-5th centuries, and the latest to the 6th century. Consequently Armaztsikhe was destroyed by the Arabs in the 8th century. There are a royal sarcophagus, vestiges of the ramparts, a fortified tower and supporting pillars, foundation walls of the palace, a bath house, a wine cellar, a pre-Christian temple and a canal system.

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Founded: 300 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Georgia

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www.itinari.com

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mirjana Prekovic (2 years ago)
Beautiful place
Giorgi Kiknavelidze (2 years ago)
The name of the city and its dominant acropolis, Armaz-Tsikhe (literally, "citadel of Armazi"; არმაზციხე), is usually taken to derive from Armazi, the chief deity of the pagan Iberian pantheon. The name first appears in the early medieval Georgian annals though it is clearly much older and reflected in the Classical name Armastica or Harmozica of Strabo, Pliny, Ptolemy and Dio Cassius. According to a collection of medieval Georgian chronicles, Armaztsikhe was founded, in the 3rd century BC, by king Pharnavaz I of Iberia at the place hitherto known as Kartli. This fortress stood on the modern-day Mount Bagineti, on the right bank of the Mtkvari River (Kura), at its confluence with the Aragvi. The other citadel, Tsitsamuri (წიწამური) or Sevsamora of the Classical authors, stood just opposite, on the left bank of the Aragvi and controlled the road towards Mount Kazbek.
Gio Rekh (3 years ago)
It is on plain sight but not everyone knows whats there. Site is well organised, roadmarks everywhere but u will need an SUV to get there. road is pretty bumpy and steep at the beginning.
Tengiz Cholokashvili (3 years ago)
Beautiful views of nature and Unesko Heritage town Mtskheta, ancient ruin's: castle, Romanian bathing place, wine sellar
Africia Zyxer (5 years ago)
You will need to use imagination and better to get there prepared, read and make some research maybe, cause there is still no special guide or detailed information on site, only pointers and brief explanation. But what you will discover then from historical point of view about country and whole area will amaze you, with no doubts! You will find ancient historic sandwiches there, starting from IV-III BC till early Christian periods, also many things to be still revealed and rediscovered even by the same archaeological researches maybe. The place is for ancient seekers and for those who love chasing history. It starts here.
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