Zagreb Archaeological Museum

Zagreb, Croatia

The Archaeological Museum in Zagreb has over 450,000 varied artifacts and monuments, gathered from various sources but mostly from Croatia and in particular from the surroundings of Zagreb.

The archaeological collection of the State Institute had been kept in the Academy mansion at Zrinski Square from the 1880s and remained there until 1945, when the museum moved to its current location at the 19th-century Vranyczany-Hafner mansion, 19 Zrinski Square.

The museum consists of five main sections: Prehistory, Egypt, Antiquity, Middle Ages, Coins and Medals. The section 'Prehistory' contains 78,000 objects, ranging from the Paleolithic to the Late Iron Age. The section 'Egypt' displays about 600 objects in the permanent exhibition. The section 'Antiquity' contains an important collection of Greek vases (about 1,500 vessels) and stones with inscriptions.

The Roman Antiquity is represented by many statues, military equipment, metal objects, Roman religion and art and objects from everyday life, acquired through systematic archaeological excavations in various Croatian regions in many Croatian cities founded during the Roman Empire. The numismatic section is among the largest collections of this type in Europe.

Some of the famous artifacts include  Vučedol dove, a flagon shaped as a bird, Liber Linteus, 3rd century BCE mummy and bandages with the longest Etruscan inscription in existence and Lumbarda Psephisma, 4th century BCE stone inscription detailing the founding of an ancient Greek colony on the island of Korčula.

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Details

Founded: 1846
Category: Museums in Croatia

More Information

amz.hr
en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kata Logan (12 months ago)
Excellent collections! Some of the best I've seen.
Adnan Melkić (12 months ago)
I even got an adventure for free! They locked us in a section of the museum thinking all the visitors had already left. Was fun!
Simon Pugnet (13 months ago)
Very well laid out exhibits with descriptions in both Croatian and English. I also took a guided tour (in English) which was very interesting and fun! Prehistory, bronze age, iron age, Egyptian, Greek and Roman permanent exhibits. The building is also pretty spectacular!
Ana Levak (13 months ago)
My 8yo daughter and I have been here twice and we love it. They have amazing prehistory and Egyptian collections (there's a mummy, although it isn't Egyptian, several sarcophagi and authentic Book of the Dead papyri, among other things). There's a lovely Greco-Roman collection too but we love the Egypt room so much we want to live there. Seriously. When you visit, don't miss the opportunity to take a ride in Zagreb's oldest elevator. And have a cup of coffee in the beautiful cafe in the garden. Admittance is unbelievably cheap for such an amazing place!
Llubitza Banic (16 months ago)
Highly recommend to come. I was here on a free night museum. I regretted not come before. The place has many floors and is filled of great collections. I was very impressed with the Roman, Greek and Egyptian collection .
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