Zagreb Archaeological Museum

Zagreb, Croatia

The Archaeological Museum in Zagreb has over 450,000 varied artifacts and monuments, gathered from various sources but mostly from Croatia and in particular from the surroundings of Zagreb.

The archaeological collection of the State Institute had been kept in the Academy mansion at Zrinski Square from the 1880s and remained there until 1945, when the museum moved to its current location at the 19th-century Vranyczany-Hafner mansion, 19 Zrinski Square.

The museum consists of five main sections: Prehistory, Egypt, Antiquity, Middle Ages, Coins and Medals. The section 'Prehistory' contains 78,000 objects, ranging from the Paleolithic to the Late Iron Age. The section 'Egypt' displays about 600 objects in the permanent exhibition. The section 'Antiquity' contains an important collection of Greek vases (about 1,500 vessels) and stones with inscriptions.

The Roman Antiquity is represented by many statues, military equipment, metal objects, Roman religion and art and objects from everyday life, acquired through systematic archaeological excavations in various Croatian regions in many Croatian cities founded during the Roman Empire. The numismatic section is among the largest collections of this type in Europe.

Some of the famous artifacts include  Vučedol dove, a flagon shaped as a bird, Liber Linteus, 3rd century BCE mummy and bandages with the longest Etruscan inscription in existence and Lumbarda Psephisma, 4th century BCE stone inscription detailing the founding of an ancient Greek colony on the island of Korčula.

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Details

Founded: 1846
Category: Museums in Croatia

More Information

amz.hr
en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reinaldo Gabay (2 years ago)
You can´t leave Zagreb without a visit to this museum. It is very surprising to find such a collection of egyptian, greek, roman and slavic objects in the same place: flasks, containers, statues, coins, helmets, swords, steles, mummies... Explanations of each object is written both in croatian and english. A large number of historical events and maps are also very well explained in both languages. The biggest surprise of the museum is the egyptian mummy, with all its sarcophagi. This museum is located in a lovely place, just in front of Zrinjevac Park, one of the most beautiful places in Zagreb. Don't miss this Museum when you come to Zagreb.
Ivan Spirydonau (2 years ago)
Make sure to pay a visit to Archaeological Museum that contains 450,000 various artifacts and monuments of Paleolithic, Late Iron Age and other historical periods. One of the most important artifacts, however, is the mummy and the wrapping that was used to preserve it. This wrapping contains the longest Etruscan script (Liber Linteus) that dates to the 3rd century BC. Absolute revelation! Compulsory place to visit while in Zagreb.
sajida ibrahim (2 years ago)
Nice and small, this museum is in the middle of the city. Centrally focuses, detailed context is provided with the option of using a guide. Each floor provides insightful relics to each era. Although museum may have been damaged by the earthquake that recently hit Zagreb.
Matia Pavlić (2 years ago)
Amazing place, you can witness all the different ages on this part of the Earth...
Sharp Decors (2 years ago)
Amazing place, you can witness all the different ages on this part of the Earth...
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