Elbasan Castle Walls

Elbasan, Albania

Elbasan castle is a 15th-century fortress, initially composed of 26 equidistant 9-metre high towers. The site seems to have been abandoned until the Ottoman army built a military camp there, followed by urban reconstruction under Sultan Mehmet II in 1466. Mehmet constructed a massive four-sided castle with a deep moat and three gates. He named it Elbasan, meaning 'conquered country' in Turkish. He had built the castle in order to fight Skanderbeg, due to an ongoing conflict between the Ottomans and Albanians.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Super Turk (12 months ago)
Very nice quiet city. Good for having peaceful time butaybe for one day and that's it. You could not stay longer as there's not a big attraction in the city.
Michael Eastham (12 months ago)
Very good castle to visit, with Traverna inside the walls.
Naty 8 (13 months ago)
The oldest and most traditional castle of Elbasan
Bashkim Hoxha (13 months ago)
Its not like there is a castle though , just the city protection wall once upon a time still standing , dont even know why they call it the castle , but its nice to see the history still present
Tanislava Gorska (14 months ago)
Eclectic place, as the whole city. Very interesting to see all this mixture of architectural styles. I've never seen something like that, it is definitely worth seeing.
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