The Tirana Mosaic is believed to have been part of a 3rd century Roman house, referred to by local archeologists as the 'Villa rustica'. Later, in the 5th and 6th centuries, a Paleo-Christian Basilica was built around this site.

The ruins of this Paleo-Christian Basilica were discovered in 1972. In 2002, some other objects were found around the ruins of the house, and today they form the Archaeological Complex of the Mosaic of Tirana. It is the only archaeological monument within the city. Some of the ancient mosaics discovered at the site that feature diverse geometrical patterns and depict poultry and fish.

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Founded: 3rd century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Klevis Dollonja (3 years ago)
Tiranas first steps of civilisation are here
Simon Tamás (3 years ago)
Nice historical place with mosaics from the Time of the Roman Empire.
Uta Akdemir (3 years ago)
It is an interesting visit but don't expect too much
hector jammara (4 years ago)
Mosaic of Tirana is a unique piece of art not found in the coastline where usualy civilitation was established in the first centuries of our era. Thought to be part of a Roman house and clasified from the arceologist that discovered the site as the third century AC, the mosaic still resist and it is well conserved and fenced to be protected as a part of arceological and cultural heritage of Tirana city as a capital of Albania. Since 73, the site is proclamed as culture monument and included in the list of arceological sites of Albania.
Edi Vasili (4 years ago)
A very nice historical place, easy to find and enjoyable to see.
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