Convento de la Magdalena

Antequera, Spain

Convento de la Magdalena was a convent, now a hotel, situated to the southwest of the town of Antequera. The convent was established in 1570 by the merchant, Ildefonso Alvarez, who possessed an altarpiece of the Virgin Magdalena. Alvarez took refuge in the area's caves and lived like a hermit. In the following three years, he struggled to pay his debts and eventually attracted the attention of the Christian community who helped him. In 1585, construction started on a small chapel in the area.

In 1648 the place became renowned for the healing from the plague by Father Cardenas, a pastor of Seville who had journeyed to the little church. Fame and abundant alms sowed corruption among hermits. In 1685, the hermits were expelled by order of the Bishop of Málaga. The order of the Discalced Franciscans took over the management of the church in 1691 and began construction of the new convent. In 1761 the guardian of the convent was reported to be Fr. Juan Gomez. The convent was abandoned in the mid-19th century.

In 2009, the convent underwent a careful restoration and became a five star hotel that left many of the original features of the Franciscan convent. Many frescoes still remain on the arched ceilings and walls.

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Details

Founded: 1570
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yevgeniya Shiryayeva (3 months ago)
We booked another hotel from same chain in Antequera and were transferred to this place due to covid. It’s 15 minutes drive outside of Antequera, but totally worth it. It’s a very quiet, isolated, beautiful place, surrounded by mountains and with its own long history. We loved exploring buildings in the evening, it was like traveling into the past or visiting a museum. Classic music is playing everywhere and it gives even more relaxing feeling to it. Breakfast was good and served with all covid regulations. Even though spa was closed we had great time in the pool and jacuzzi. Room on the ground floor have access to gardens where you can find fruits and vegetables growing. It was a pleasant change and we would definitely recommend it.
Tom Mathie (4 months ago)
Lovely location, friendly staff, very relaxing.
Kathryn Mathie (5 months ago)
Very tranquil. Friendly staff and comfortable beds. Enjoying the food too!
Celso Cavadas (5 months ago)
What a place. I'll come back as soon as I can. Special compliments to the staff.
A T (2 years ago)
The hotel is located in an absolutely stunning setting and the building is quite beautiful. However, I wouldn't expect 5-star quality. The mattress was ridiculously uncomfortable and the spa is in serious need of refurbishment (also, the steam room wasn't working). Restaurant food was mediocre and over-priced.
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