Convento de la Magdalena

Antequera, Spain

Convento de la Magdalena was a convent, now a hotel, situated to the southwest of the town of Antequera. The convent was established in 1570 by the merchant, Ildefonso Alvarez, who possessed an altarpiece of the Virgin Magdalena. Alvarez took refuge in the area's caves and lived like a hermit. In the following three years, he struggled to pay his debts and eventually attracted the attention of the Christian community who helped him. In 1585, construction started on a small chapel in the area.

In 1648 the place became renowned for the healing from the plague by Father Cardenas, a pastor of Seville who had journeyed to the little church. Fame and abundant alms sowed corruption among hermits. In 1685, the hermits were expelled by order of the Bishop of Málaga. The order of the Discalced Franciscans took over the management of the church in 1691 and began construction of the new convent. In 1761 the guardian of the convent was reported to be Fr. Juan Gomez. The convent was abandoned in the mid-19th century.

In 2009, the convent underwent a careful restoration and became a five star hotel that left many of the original features of the Franciscan convent. Many frescoes still remain on the arched ceilings and walls.

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Details

Founded: 1570
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Karen Rolph (2 years ago)
Beautiful quiet location with pool and spa facilities. Great food luxurious bathroom and bedroom. Highly recommended
Francisco Javier Alvarez Granado (2 years ago)
They have good facilities for any kind of events but it is far away from the road deep in the mountain. I think is good for private meeting, incentives,
Luc De Block (2 years ago)
exceptional place, beautiful location wirh views on Torcal mountains , old restaured mon nastry, good for hiking, golf, cycling. excellent breakfast buffet, spacious rooms. Nice interior swimmingpool with jacuzzi and sauna. Dinner a bit dissapointing and too expensive in proportion to quality
Luc de block (2 years ago)
very cosy, special, place, old monastery, with its own little museum and chapel. Rooms fantastic, especially upstairs . Location superb if one likes an insulated place in nature. Food less, certainly in proportion to price, although breakfast is great an varied . Great spa with sauna and covered swimming pool, miss the fitness room though. Nice garden looking at the great Thorcal mountain range also visible from the breakfast, lunch, dining area. Recommended. Go there often. Has a very special and unique character . Amen
Max Carvalho (3 years ago)
It's a nice place to stay. Pros: Beautiful sightseeing, friendly services, spacious and clean rooms. Cons: A bit expensive taking in consideration the prices around Antequera. The hotel could be more modern. The room can be noisy if you want to sleep til bit later.
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