Salvador Church

Seville, Spain

The Salvador church was erected on the remains of the Ibn Adabba, the Great Mosque of Muslim Seville (9th century). This religious temple, as well as its surroundings, had great importance in the daily life of the people, which is why when the Christians conquered Seville, they allowed it to be used as a mosque in the beginning, but in 1340, it was converted into the parish of Salvador.

In addition, it was agreed to maintain the ostentatious rank of the second temple of the city; for it was granted a collegiate character. Thus, this building would continue to be used religiously until 1671, when the passage of time left it strongly deteriorated. Its construction as we see it today began in 1674 with the architect Esteban García. Work ended in 1712 under the architect Leonardo de Figueroa.

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Founded: 1674
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.visitasevilla.es

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David McChang (2 years ago)
Heavy on the gold paint and cherubs ! Nice if you like that sort of thing. Main advantage is if you go here and get a combo ticket for here and the Cathedral it saves queuing.
Maureen Smith (2 years ago)
Your breath is literally taken away as you enter this spectacular church. The architecture is quite overwhelming. A wonderful place to sit and reflect and pray.
Jonathan H (2 years ago)
Dare I say it...we think we might have preferred this church to the cathedral. More accessible, less people. Very beautiful. And you can buy your Cathedral entry tickets from here saving yourself a lot of time.
Gearóid McGauran (2 years ago)
What a stunning hidden gem! We went here to get a combo ticket for this and the main cathedral so we didn't have to queue for ages at the main cathedral. But the altars in this cathedral are more spectacular than the main cathedral. Really jawdropping!
Barbara Tagliavini (2 years ago)
A "hidden" gem in Seville. One of the most beautiful churches of the city and it mustn't be overlooked. You will be surprised once you walk in. Rich, gorgeous, awe-inspiring. One of my most cherished memories of the many churches and sights visited.
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