Puertas de Tierra

Cádiz, Spain

Puertas de Tierra is a bastion-monument built around remnants of the old defensive wall at the entrance to the city of Cadiz. Built by academic architect Torcuato Cayón in the 18th century, the cover is carved in marble and was intended more as a religious altarpiece than as a military fortification.

It is one of the most significant monuments of the city and on its walls flies the purple flag of its canton.

The adjustment to the new architecture of the city, opening the two new arcs, is performed by the architect Antonio Sánchez Esteve.

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Founded: 18th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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