Museum of Cádiz

Cádiz, Spain

The Museum of Cadiz was founded in 1970 after the merger of the Provincial Museum of Fine Arts with the Provincial Museum of Archaeology. It is on three floors, archaeology on the ground floor, art on the first, and puppets on the second floor. Entry is free for citizens of the European Union.

The origin of the museum came in 1835, when art was confiscated from a monastery, including paintings by Zurbarán taken from the Charterhouse of Jerez de la Frontera. Other paintings included the works of Murillo and Rubens. The collection grew during the century, due to the city's Academy of Fine Arts which practised romanticism and neoclassicism. In 1877, after a Phoenician sarcophagus was found in the city's shipyard, the Archaeological Museum was founded. However, it was not until 1970 that the two institutes, despite sharing the same building, were merged. From 1980, the architect Javier Feduchi planned a reform of the building in three phases, of which two have been completed.

In addition to the 19th-century pieces, the art museum has received contemporary art from the Junta de Andalucía. Its archaeological section has also received donations, particularly of coins. Despite a range of prehistoric findings from Southern Andalusia, due to local history, it has a lack of artefacts from the Middle Ages. The 'Tía Norica' set of puppets, used at the Carnival of Cádiz, was acquired by the State.

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Founded: 1970
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eljan Rimsa (2 years ago)
Cadiz is a different kind of old. It has already been old when the Romans took over and this museum shows it. A freakily well-preserved pair of Phoenician sarcophags showed up during the last 2 centuries. But there's so much more. The garum industry explained. The religion of Baal and Melkart and their Greco-Roman interpretation. Best of all I liked the miniature Egyptian gods which to the trade-oriented Phoenicians must have been curious artefacts of an ancient yet inward-bound culture.
Jill Hetherington (2 years ago)
The art exhibition was closed temporarily. Otherwise there are very impressive artefacts - and it's free entry
Emilia Woskowiak (2 years ago)
A lot of artefacts from Fencian and Roman time i Cadiz. Really impressive collection. Loved it
Christopher Davies (2 years ago)
Sadly the art section of this museum is closed for renovations. But this does not distract from the fascinating Phoenician and Roman items. The puppet section is also available and records an interesting facet of the city's history. The staff were helpful particularly after I fell over a step. Thank you.
Arija Noel (2 years ago)
Great Roman Statues and mosaics. Most artifacts were found in Cadiz or close by. 1st floor has paintings by Spanish artists. Top floor is contemporary paintings.
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