San Bartolomé Chapel

Córdoba, Spain

The Chapel of San Bartolomé is a funerary chapel in the historic centre of Córdoba. It is dated between 1390 and 1410. Richly decorated, it is one of the city's finest examples of Mudéjar art.

Located on the Calle Averroes in today's Faculty of Arts building, the relatively unknown chapel is one of the city's most notable monuments. With the development of the Alcázar Viejo district in 1391 and the later expulsion of the Jews from La Judería, the parish of San Bartolomé was established while a church of the same name was constructed between 1399 and 1410. The little building continued to operate as a parish church until the 17th century, possibly awaiting completion of a larger church.

Rectangular in shape, the area is divided into two sections, one for the chapel itself, the other for a courtyard. Built of rusticated sandstone, the chapel has a rectangular floor measuring 9m by 5m. The chancel is slightly higher than the remainder of the building. There are two doors, one through a porch opening into a courtyard on Calle Averroes, the second, strangely locked from the outside, providing access into a side chapel which may have been connected to a sacristy in another building.

The entrance from the courtyard has a pointed arch with a few simple decorations while the other entrance, also pointed, has zigzag or sawtooth decorations. Two small columns bearing Islamic decorations with scrolls and leaves support the elegantly rib-vaulted ceiling. The interior walls are richly decorated with yeseria plasterwork and tiling while the floor is also decorated with alternating tiles. The wall decorations combine depictions of plants, geometric patterns and heraldry. The coats of arms belong to the Knights of the Band, an order created by King Alfonso XI. Inscriptions are in both Kufic and Naskh scripts.

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Details

Founded: 1390-1410
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M Vorobyev (9 months ago)
2 euros for what? The whole place is 10 sqm and the visit takes less than 1 minute. Tourist trap and robbery
Per-Arne Ohlsson (9 months ago)
Small but beautiful
suseth garcia (11 months ago)
A must see area of cordoba! Make sure to do a tour!
Mohammed Boutahar (12 months ago)
Viste a room for 1,50 euro is a theft greedy.
Debbie Garner (15 months ago)
There is only the one area to see. Whilst lovely price seemed high.
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