Santa Marina Church

Córdoba, Spain

Santa Marina is one of the so-called 'Fernandinean Churches', edificated in the city after Ferdinand III of Castile conquered it from the Moors in the 13th century. The structure combines proto-Gothic, Mudéjar and, to a lesser degree, late-Romanesque elements.

The church, one of the oldest of the Fernandinean group, was built in the second half of the 13th century where previously a Moorish mosque and before that a 7th-century Visigothic church had existed. No trace of them remains today.

On 23 June 1880 the church suffered a fire, which required a restoration lasting two years. Other renovations were carried out in the 19th and 20th centuries, during which the medieval appearance of the building was restored, by removing the Baroque additions introduced after the damage from the 1680 and 1755 earthquakes.

The church has a rectangular, or basilica, plan, divided into a nave and two aisles, the nave being far higher than the latter. The aisles are separated from the nave by large pointed arches.

The facade is characterized by four large, asymmetrical buttresses, ending with pinnacles, and corresponding to the interior separation between nave and aisles. Also present are a main central rose window, smaller circular windows, and alfizes over the ogival arch of the main portal. The facade corresponding to the left aisle features a secondary portal, surmounted by a triangular arch.

The apses are polygonal. In the right aisle is the sacristy, built in the 15th century. The left aisle apse was adapted to house a Baroque chapel from 1630. The bell tower dates to the 16th century.

The 'retablo' of the Main Chapel houses paintings by Antonio del Castillo and sculptures from the local artist Gómez de Sandoval.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

FRANCISC DIONISIE AARON (3 years ago)
One of the seven catholic churches rebuild by king Fernando III, in the XIII-th century. After the famous battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, in 1212, a great part of Andalusia was reconquerrd by the Christians. An important project of reconstruction/transformation of churches began.
Igor Krestnikov (3 years ago)
I would recommend a trip over Cordoba's churches provided with tickets to Mezquita.
Joe Milanes (3 years ago)
One of the most beautiful and enchanting churches in Cordoba. The impressive buttresses and the unusual structure of the building are the things you should go for and visit this church. It's well preserved and its location is quite amazing as you suddenly see it coming out after waking in some narrow streets. It's majestic!
Johny Wackler (3 years ago)
Awesome place!
Joe Cabello (3 years ago)
Top class church! And even better now with the new inner illumination system. Great community and very welcoming priests.
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