Torreparedones

Baena, Spain

Located in Baena, the Torreparedones Archaeological Park, also known as Torre de las Vírgenes and Castro el Viejo, is one of the most important archaeological places in the province of Cordoba from an archaeological viewpoint. Since the Modern Age it has been known for the casual appearance of notable remains that reflect the category it once had in antiquity.

It is located in the heart the Cordoba countryside and is part of the municipal districts of Baena and Castro del Río. It also has a visitor reception centre and a large car park.

The site was inhabited from the end of the Neolithic era until the beginning of the 16th century, reaching its maximum splendour in Iberian and Roman times, when it obtained the status of colony or municipal district. The most significant finds date from these times.

The most significant elements which the site provides these days are Roman buildings like the East door with a road in perfect condition, the forum and adjacent buildings, spas and the market, the medieval castle, a 16th century chapel, the necropolis with underground tombs and the Iberian-Roman sanctuary located to the South, outside the walls, where hundreds of votive offerings have been sculpted in stone, and where the faithful deposited their offerings for several centuries dedicated to the god which was worshipped there: Dea Caelestis.

The chance discovery of the so-called “Mausoleum of the Pompeyos”, in 1833, a monumental tomb containing the incinerated remains of 12 people from the same family, with their names etched in stone urns, was a landmark in the history of the site because it drew the attention of numerous national and foreign researchers.

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Baena, Spain
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Details

Founded: 1st century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.andalucia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carmen Lizana (9 months ago)
Cierre de entrada una hora antes del cierre del yacimiento, ya que se tarda al menos una hora en recorrerlo. El acceso no está nada bien ya que es camino rural , pero lo que encuentras al aventurarte en el camino es muy gratificante.
Montserrat Serrano Bañon (10 months ago)
Magnifico yacimiento, bien tratado, espectacular, no tengo palabras pues me ha sorprendido enormemente.
beatriu cruset ballart (10 months ago)
Una muy agradable sorpresa. Imprescindible si visitas la zona. La persona nos atendio contagiaba entusiasmo por el lugar y los trabajos que se estan llevando a cabo. Me recordó la visita que hice a la ciudad de Empuries cuando era niña: un mundo por descubrir.
Elisa Mandelli (12 months ago)
Spazio archeologico immerso negli ulivi, con monumenti che coprono diverse ere storiche. In Italia si ricostruisce meno, quindi il cemento mi è risultato un po "fastidioso", in ogni caso una bella esperienza!
Cristina López (14 months ago)
Espectacular lugar ! Me sorprendió gratamente y todo lo que tiene aún que mostrar. Muestra de un buena apuesta por parte del ayuntamiento para poner en valor su patrimonio . Volveré dentro de unos años para ver evolución .
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