Hannibal's Bridge

Rapallo, Italy

Hannibal's Bridge (Ponte Annibale) is apparently one of the oldest structures in Rapallo. This bridge was possibly used by Carthaginian commander Hannibal during his campaign against Rome in the second Punic War, where he possibly unloaded supplies on the Tigullia coast (region from Portofino to Anzo di Framura). The bridge could also be connected to the Battle of Trebbia (218 BC).

The structure's name first appears in a notary deed dated April 7, 1049, where it is claimed that 'Rainaldo donated some land near the bridge to the Genovese Church of Santa Maria di Castello'.

The bridge was renovated in 1733 after widespread flooding. Ninety years later, after the Kingdom of Sardinia had annexed all of Liguria, the final section of the creek that the bridge spanned was diverted to construct a new road to Santa Margherita. Today, the overgrown bridge is closed off to the public but is visibly located in downtown Rapallo, crossing over the Corso Cristoforo Colombo thoroughfare to Santa Margherita.

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Details

Founded: 3rd century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

JEAN PAUL AMBROSIO (11 months ago)
Rapallo ville de bord de mer, parfait endroit pour visiter portofino et les 5 terres.
Lory Demartini (15 months ago)
Attribuito erroneamente ad Annibale,l'antico ponte in stile Romano,e' un pezzo di storia.Il piu' antico atto che da' notizia del ponte,e' del 7 aprile 1049.Tratta di una donazione dove Rainaldo dono' alla chiesa di Santa Maria di Castello i beni che possedeva a Rapallo tra cui le terre che si trovavano intorno al ponte.A causa di numerose alluvioni il ponte venne riparato e ristrutturato nel 1733....Novant'anni piu' tardi,nel 1823,si decise di deviare il torrente Boate nel tratto finale,per realizzare una nuova strada carrozzabile per Santa Margherita.Per questo motivo oggi il ponte rimane un opera da ammirare x la sua linea e x le antiche pietre.
gio olmi (21 months ago)
Ben segnalata la sua particolarità storica e ben tenuto ..peccato sia un punto nevralgico x il traffico(velocità auto,manovre grandi mezzi x centrare l'altezza giusta dell'arcata)e per l'attraversamento dei pedoni.. Non è certo "colpa" del monumento ma riduce il tempo dedicato alla sua "ammirazione"! Risolvo guardandolo da via Marco Polo,vedendolo " entrare"sul retro di un giardino privato,con fiori e voli di tortore!
Enrico Knoll (3 years ago)
You can't cross the old bridge...
Jason Freeman (3 years ago)
The bridge itself is very impressive but the location is not very attractive because it is too closed in with buildings to appreciate the structure. Also you cannot walk on the bridge. The sign board is not very helpful as it does not explain actual history of the bridge very well. For example it could talk about when it might date from given the design of the bridge and the materials used, and where the route it is on actually led to. In this regard the description on the Commune di Rapallo website is better. There is instead a lengthy discussion about the early tribes that lived in the area at the time of Hannibal, which is irrelevant since clearly Hannibal did not built this bridge. Further it is unlikely that the Teguli derived their name from a type of tile as the sign board claims, and more likely that the type of tile tool its name from them. It would be better to describe when the bridge was first associated with Hannibal and why.
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