Tellenburg Castle was built around 1200 by the Lords of Kien. After the Lords of Kien, the Lords of Wädenswil became the owners of the castle. They were followed by the Lords of Turn in 1312 and then later by the city of Bern. The original castle was expanded and repaired in the 13th or 14th centuries.

Under Bernese rule, the castle served as the administrative seat of the surrounding area until the creation of the Helvetic Republic in 1798. After 1798 it was used as a poor house. In 1885, the castle was gutted in a fire. It was never rebuilt and has slowly fallen into ruin.

Tellenburg Castle was built as an administrative center and toll station. Telle at beginning of the name likely comes from the German word for toll, Zoll, while burg simply means fortress.

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Founded: c. 1200
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Graham Trafford (6 months ago)
Lovely old castle, but closed for the winter, so couldn't go inside and up to the top!
Wasif Janjua (14 months ago)
Less a castle.. more a mansion.. but now lying in ruin.. the dizzying walk all the way to the top on the narrow staircase is frightening if you have fear of heights ... but really worth the walk once you get to the top... the views are stunning...!!!
madmike 88252 (18 months ago)
Nice place to stay and have some pic-nic, also places where you can do a campfire.
Melissa Wilkerson (2 years ago)
I walked from Frutigen to Kandersteg one day and I stopped to eat lunch in the ruins of this castle. What an amazing experience to get to lunch in the ruins of 900 year old castle! The ruins are beautiful and you can really connect with the past as you sit and eat your lunch. Definitely one of the highlight of my trip!
Lancelot Lancelot (2 years ago)
Beautiful and old tower with a scary stairs ;) A wonderful view from the top.
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