Basílica de Santa María la Mayor

Pontevedra, Spain

The basilica of Santa Maria la Mayor is one of the jewels in the crown of Galician Gothic architecture. It was built in the 16th century, by order of the Guild of fishermen. It was granted the status of small basilica in 1962, by Pope John XXIII. 

The west façade that was designed by Cornelius de Holanda, has been built in the style of an altarpiece, with three ornately decorated sections. There is a massive transept in the south façade and the main entrance opens up under a semicircular arch, bordered by a stone jamb and ornate Baroque ornamentation. Inside there are three naves that are separated by columns. The High Altarpiece, is made of chestnut tree wood and walnut tree wood, dating back to the end of the nineteenth century. It is a work of art that was made by a cabinetmaker and woodcarver from Santiago. To the left of the south doorway lies a sculpture of the Christ of Safe Journeys, to which the faithful flock in the hope that they may be granted protection during their journeys.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.spain.info

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Leroy Asher (11 months ago)
Love the majestic interior.
Joseph Rodriguez (2 years ago)
Beautiful church, more than a museum, an active church with community involvement. Knowledgeable staff.
Jim Mannoia (2 years ago)
Very sweet of the elderly woman to allow us in even though she was moments from closing the church at 10 p.m. Beautiful to see especially empty and late at night.
Gerard Fleming (2 years ago)
This is a simply decorated church in the city. Really peaceful and a great church for contemplation.
Carlos Pinon (2 years ago)
A lovely little church in the centre of a nice city. Something I would recommend to visit at night. A small donation of 1€ you go up to the "Mirador" and while you go to the top there are a couple of museum rooms to enjoy some religious artifacts. A nice church which we didn't look around but worth the time to sit and enjoy it's beauty.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.