Castle da Rocha Forte was built by Archbishop Juan Arias around 1240 and has since served as an archbishop's and cabildo's residence, witnessing much of the medieval history of Santiago. In the year 1255 appears the first documentary mention of the fortress in relation to the capitular constitutions of Juan Arias. The castle was situated in a strategic location by road from Padrón village to Santiago. Pilgrims followed that route from Portugal.

In addition to its purpose for defence, the castle was also a home for the Archbishop, which could provide the men of the local church a shelter from rioting citizens. In 1317, Berenguel de Landoira was nominated as Archbishop. The residents did not like him and started a rebellion. Archbishop Landoira had all the leaders of the rebellion executed. In the 15th century in Irmandiño wars the castle was damaged badly and it was abandoned. Later, in 1472 the walls were dismantled. During the Franco era the ruins were used as a hideout. In 1962, an electricity pylon was installed to the castle area.

Since 2001, a series of archaeological excavations have been carried out, thanks to an agreement between the City Council of Santiago and the University of Santiago de Compostela, in order to recover the deposit and consolidate it by means of the creation of an Archaeological Park.

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Founded: c. 1240
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Jorge Guitián (3 months ago)
Very interesting. A pity that it is difficult to find it open.
Gerardo Abal (3 months ago)
A great history and hopefully when they finish the rehabilitation of the ruins a good tourist visit. Incredibly forgotten but with so much to tell
María Cecilia Rodríguez-Couto López (4 months ago)
It is currently in the process of recovery and cannot be accessed. We will have to wait a little longer to enjoy its story.
Carlota Alexandra López Costas (6 months ago)
Cerrado al público. Todo vallado y con mal mantenimiento de la zona exterior. Recomendación: da toda la vuelta a la muralla, por detrás se puede ver de cerca.
Luis Santamaria (11 months ago)
The excavation is very well preserved, the only thing I find missing is that the Camino de Santiago should pass through here. Although the ruins are fenced to avoid deterioration, it would be very nice for pilgrims to be able to pass by these centuries-old stones.
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