Monterreal Fortress

Baiona, Spain

Monterreal Fortress is located on the Monte Boi peninsula, also know as Monterreal. This site has been known over the past 2000 years as the walled precinct. Pre-Christian civilisations such as the Celts, the Phoenicians and the Romans lived here in the past. During the present time, the place was occupied by many different people and it suffered a number of attacks and modifications. The village of Baiona was site here due to a royal privilege issued by The Catholic Kings, as a defence against the corsair incursions.

The peninsula covers an area of 18 hectares and sis surrounded by 3 Km of crenellated battlement walls dating back from the 11th to the 17th centuries. This place changed ownership over the years until 1963, when it was acquired by the Ministry of Information & Tourism to convert it into a Parador Hotel named Conde de Gondomar.

The fort has three important towers: the Tower of the Clock is found near the entrance. Inside this tower there was a hidden warning bell which served as an alarm in case of enemy attacks. The Tower of the Tenaille rises to the East: its duty was to defend the port with artillery. In the West the Tower of the Prince stands over the bay. This is probably the oldest tower and it used to serve as lighthouse for vessels. It shows three coats of arms (the Austrias's, the Sotomaior's and the one of Baiona). The tower was named after the Portuguese prince Afonso Enriques, imprisoned inside the tower in 1137.

The Fortress can be visited all through the year. Amazing sunsets over the ria and the Cíes islands can be admired from the walls. Not to miss the coastline along which Baiona stretches.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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User Reviews

Jose Manuel Martinez de la Fuente (8 months ago)
A spectacular place from which to enjoy a good walk with beautiful views of Baiona. Currently the fortress is a hostel where you can stay. It is recommended to visit on a day with little fog.
Irene vicente lara (9 months ago)
A beautiful picture. It has views and a beautiful sunset, a place with a romantic touch. Let us not stop taking care of such a wonderful place, that its maintenance be maintained and no garbage is left.
Jesús Martín (15 months ago)
It is recommended to take a walk around the fortress. Nice views of Baiona.
Captain Arawak (16 months ago)
Fortress whose first traces go back well before Jesus Christ. The castle now disappeared dates from the 10th century and as for the fortifications it is Alfonso XI who built them. Alphonse was a contemporary of Philippe VI le Valois in France. It is likely that they never met, Philippe VI being too busy fighting the English and Alphonse fighting the Moors. In 1346 the great plague made everyone agree by creating a forced truce between the various belligerents in Europe. Alphonse died of the plague in 1350 and Philippe VI also died in 1350.
Captain Arawak (16 months ago)
Fortress whose first traces go back well before Jesus Christ. The castle now disappeared dates from the 10th century and as for the fortifications it is Alfonso XI who built them. Alphonse was a contemporary of Philippe VI le Valois in France. It is likely that they never met, Philippe VI being too busy fighting the English and Alphonse fighting the Moors. In 1346 the great plague made everyone agree by creating a forced truce between the various belligerents in Europe. Alphonse died of the plague in 1350 and Philippe VI also died in 1350.
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