Monterreal Fortress

Baiona, Spain

Monterreal Fortress is located on the Monte Boi peninsula, also know as Monterreal. This site has been known over the past 2000 years as the walled precinct. Pre-Christian civilisations such as the Celts, the Phoenicians and the Romans lived here in the past. During the present time, the place was occupied by many different people and it suffered a number of attacks and modifications. The village of Baiona was site here due to a royal privilege issued by The Catholic Kings, as a defence against the corsair incursions.

The peninsula covers an area of 18 hectares and sis surrounded by 3 Km of crenellated battlement walls dating back from the 11th to the 17th centuries. This place changed ownership over the years until 1963, when it was acquired by the Ministry of Information & Tourism to convert it into a Parador Hotel named Conde de Gondomar.

The fort has three important towers: the Tower of the Clock is found near the entrance. Inside this tower there was a hidden warning bell which served as an alarm in case of enemy attacks. The Tower of the Tenaille rises to the East: its duty was to defend the port with artillery. In the West the Tower of the Prince stands over the bay. This is probably the oldest tower and it used to serve as lighthouse for vessels. It shows three coats of arms (the Austrias's, the Sotomaior's and the one of Baiona). The tower was named after the Portuguese prince Afonso Enriques, imprisoned inside the tower in 1137.

The Fortress can be visited all through the year. Amazing sunsets over the ria and the Cíes islands can be admired from the walls. Not to miss the coastline along which Baiona stretches.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jesús Martín (45 days ago)
It is recommended to take a walk around the fortress. Nice views of Baiona.
Captain Arawak (2 months ago)
Fortress whose first traces go back well before Jesus Christ. The castle now disappeared dates from the 10th century and as for the fortifications it is Alfonso XI who built them. Alphonse was a contemporary of Philippe VI le Valois in France. It is likely that they never met, Philippe VI being too busy fighting the English and Alphonse fighting the Moors. In 1346 the great plague made everyone agree by creating a forced truce between the various belligerents in Europe. Alphonse died of the plague in 1350 and Philippe VI also died in 1350.
Víctor M. Rodríguez P. (2 months ago)
What is preserved is a kind of wall that surrounds the parador area. You can walk through its upper part around the perimeter, offering beautiful views of everything around the place. You can also make the tour around the outside. It is a nice walk that continues along the entire boardwalk. There is a children's playground on the same promenade and paid underground parking.
edu roca (13 months ago)
Great 3km walk on a fortress with magnificent sightseeing
Mark Auchincloss (14 months ago)
It's situated in Monte Boi peninsula, a fortress with over 2000 years of history. There were different settlements here from the Celtic period then later the Romans. It was frequently under attack given it's strategic location. More people used to live there than in Vigo! It's 18 hectares and the walk around it's base is about 3km, well worth doing for the spectacular views. The Parador was built in the mid 60's.
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