Torres de Oeste

Catoira, Spain

Oeste Towers (Torres de Oeste) is located at the head of the Ría de Arousa. The towers remaining today are the ruins of Castellum Honesti. In the 9th century, King Alfonso III of Leon built the castle as a defense against Viking attacks. The two remaining towers are from this period, and have a pre-Roman style. Pre-Roman ceramics and bronze tools have been discovered at the site.

Two centuries later, King Alfonso V of Leon donates the fortress to the bishopric of Iria-Compostela, held at that moment by bishop Vestruarius. Subsequent bishops Cresconio, Diego Pelaez and Diego Gelmirez undertook the commitment to strengthen the Castle in order to protect the holy site of Santiago de Compostela. The structure of the Castle was defined in the 12th century. At that time, the enclosure of the Castle was formed by seven towers, and it was surrounded by marshes. The Castle has a 12th-century chapel built by Gelmirez to honor the apostle Saint James. The Castellum Honesti began its decline in the 15th century.

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Address

EP-8001 58, Catoira, Spain
See all sites in Catoira

Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marc Ll. (12 months ago)
Great place to walk around, either kids or elder people, with some historic background.
Paul Greenwell (2 years ago)
Tucked under the main road bridge. A lovely park with ruined castle on the banks of the river. Odd site but rather lovely. Recommended if you are in the area. Here's a photo but it doesn't do justice to the location or the viking boats moored up beside it.
Ramiro Bestilleiro Rey (2 years ago)
The grounds are clean, but the views and lines of sight are ruined by the road bridge above and the railway bridge further out. It's a shame no effort seems to have been made to renovate in some way the chapel, thr onky fully intact building of the these ruins. As it is, it cannot be entered.
Grazia Lorusso (3 years ago)
Magic atmosphere! I saw this monument from the boat while l was going from Villanova to padron. Early morning with the sunrise and a bit if fog it was very special!
Mark Auchincloss (3 years ago)
The remains of the 9th century fortifications ( called the western towers) that the Christians led by the bishop, Gelmirez built to defend one of the strategic entrances to Galicia originally against the Viking invasions. You get amazing views from the road bridge above. Nice walkways to arrive here too. The Viking festival here is spectacular. Even a variation of the Camino de Santiago passes here too.
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