Roman Sites in Germany

Römerhalle

Römerhalle (Roman hall) is a museum where the Roman finds from the Roman Kreuznach and its environment are presented. Outstanding exhibits two mosaic floors from the immediately adjacent to the Romans Roman Peristylvilla hall of the 3rd Century AD Once a magnificent mansion with over 5,000 square meters of covered space and more than fifty rooms on the ground floor alone, are now only remnants of the foundation walls ...
Founded: 250 AD | Location: Bad Kreuznach, Germany

European Archaeological Park of Bliesbruck-Reinheim

The European Archaeological Park at Bliesbruck-Reinheim, in the German municipality of Gersheim and the French municipality of Bliesbruck, is a cross-border project which combines excavations and reconstructions of Celtic and Roman finds with exhibition and educational facilities. It was created in 1989 as a result of the archaeological work being done on both sides of the Franco-German border. Together with archaeologica ...
Founded: | Location: Reinheim, Germany

Villa Rustica

In 1956, the discovery of a Roman countryside villa was unearthed alongside the road to Weiler Kreut, parallel to what is now the B17 neu federal highway. This existed from the beginning of the 2nd century until the middle of the 4th century AD. The site is part of a group of large villas belonging to the former province of Raetia. It is situated on the junction of the former Roman Kaiserstaße Via Claudia Augusta, w ...
Founded: 100 AD | Location: Peiting, Germany

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Ängsö Castle

Ängsö Castle was first named as "Engsev" in a royal charter by king Canute I of Sweden (r. 1167-1196), in which he stated that he had inherited the property after his father Eric IX of Sweden. Until 1272, it was owned by the Riseberga Abbey, and then taken over by Gregers Birgersson.

From 1475 until 1710, it was owned by the Sparre family. The current castle was built as a fortress by riksråd Bengt Fadersson Sparre in the 1480s. In 1522, Ängsö Castle was taken after a siege by king Gustav Vasa, since its owner, Fadersson's son Knut Bengtsson, sided with Christian II of Denmark. However, in 1538 it was given by the king to Bengtsson's daughter Hillevi Knutsdotter, who was married to Arvid Trolle.

In 1710, the castle was taken over by Carl Piper and Christina Piper. Ängsö Castle was owned by the Piper family from 1710 until 1971, and is now owned by the Westmanna foundation. The castle building itself was made into a museum in 1959 and was made a listed building in 1965. It is currently opened to visitors during the summers.

The castle is a cubical building in four stores made by stone and bricks. The lower parts is preserved from the middle ages. It was redecorated and expanded in the 1630s. The 4th storey as well as the roof is from the expansion of Carl Hårleman from 1740-41. It gained its current appearance in the 1740s.