Roman Sites in Germany

Römerhalle

Römerhalle (Roman hall) is a museum where the Roman finds from the Roman Kreuznach and its environment are presented. Outstanding exhibits two mosaic floors from the immediately adjacent to the Romans Roman Peristylvilla hall of the 3rd Century AD Once a magnificent mansion with over 5,000 square meters of covered space and more than fifty rooms on the ground floor alone, are now only remnants of the foundation walls ...
Founded: 250 AD | Location: Bad Kreuznach, Germany

European Archaeological Park of Bliesbruck-Reinheim

The European Archaeological Park at Bliesbruck-Reinheim, in the German municipality of Gersheim and the French municipality of Bliesbruck, is a cross-border project which combines excavations and reconstructions of Celtic and Roman finds with exhibition and educational facilities. It was created in 1989 as a result of the archaeological work being done on both sides of the Franco-German border. Together with archaeologica ...
Founded: | Location: Reinheim, Germany

Villa Rustica

In 1956, the discovery of a Roman countryside villa was unearthed alongside the road to Weiler Kreut, parallel to what is now the B17 neu federal highway. This existed from the beginning of the 2nd century until the middle of the 4th century AD. The site is part of a group of large villas belonging to the former province of Raetia. It is situated on the junction of the former Roman Kaiserstaße Via Claudia Augusta, w ...
Founded: 100 AD | Location: Peiting, Germany

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kalozha Church

The Kalozha church of Saints Boris and Gleb is the oldest extant structure in Hrodna. It is the only surviving monument of ancient Black Ruthenian architecture, distinguished from other Orthodox churches by prolific use of polychrome faceted stones of blue, green or red tint which could be arranged to form crosses or other figures on the wall.

The church is a cross-domed building supported by six circular pillars. The outside is articulated with projecting pilasters, which have rounded corners, as does the building itself. The ante-nave contains the choir loft, accessed by a narrow gradatory in the western wall. Two other stairs were discovered in the walls of the side apses; their purpose is not clear. The floor is lined with ceramic tiles forming decorative patterns. The interior was lined with innumerable built-in pitchers, which usually serve in Eastern Orthodox churches as resonators but in this case were scored to produce decorative effects. For this reason, the central nave has never been painted.

The church was built before 1183 and survived intact, depicted in the 1840s by Michał Kulesza, until 1853, when the south wall collapsed, due to its perilous location on the high bank of the Neman. During restoration works, some fragments of 12th-century frescoes were discovered in the apses. Remains of four other churches in the same style, decorated with pitchers and coloured stones instead of frescoes, were discovered in Hrodna and Vaŭkavysk. They all date back to the turn of the 13th century, as do remains of the first stone palace in the Old Hrodna Castle.

In 2004, the church was included in the Tentative List of UNESCO"s World Heritage Sites.