Barbara Baths

Trier, Germany

The Barbara Baths (Barbarathermen) are a large Roman bath complex designated as part of the Roman Monuments, Cathedral of St. Peter and Church of Our Lady in Trier UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Barbara Baths were built in the second century AD. The extensive ruins were used as a castle in the Middle Ages, then torn down and recycled as building material until the remains were used for constructing a Jesuit College in 1610.

Only the foundations and the subterranean service tunnels have survived, but the technical details of the sewer systems, the furnaces, the pools, and the heating system can be studied better than in the other two baths of Trier.

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Address

Südallee 48, Trier, Germany
See all sites in Trier

Details

Founded: 100-200 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adrianell Poteet Sorrels (9 months ago)
Interesting site. Great descriptions in English with pictures so you can see what they are talking about and picture what it used to look like. Looks like they need more funding to do more excavating and they could probably find more artifacts.
k o (9 months ago)
It beats the Viehmarkt Thermen, that is for sure. And it was free :D
Vincent Mulder (10 months ago)
As it is freely accessible worth the visit.
RIEN SNIJDER (11 months ago)
Interesting. I would like to go in a time machine and have a look when it was operational! Turned out to be located only a few min walk from my hotel. Lucky
Kari Cooper (11 months ago)
Free to visit. Multiple signs with accompanying pictures to view and read the history of the baths. It doesn't take long to walk through (5-10min depending on if you stop to read the signs) but it's a nice little pitstop.
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