The earliest masonry at Restenneth Priory dates to the 1100s, Alexander I had the annals of Iona transferred to the priory in the 1100s, and Robert the Bruce buried his young son Prince John here in the 1300s.

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Address

Forfar, United Kingdom
See all sites in Forfar

Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

More Information

visitangus.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shona Norman (14 months ago)
Lovely location, interesting place!
alex Taylor (14 months ago)
Great for a pleasant outdoor picnic. Easy accessible off small car park.
Anthony Wake (2 years ago)
Very nice and quiet place. I took my new camera here to try out and didn't see another person the whole time. Was lovely just to have a cup of tea and relax. Has information around the place with historical facts
Kevin Thomson (2 years ago)
Restenneth Priory is well worth a visit. Fantastic example of hidden history. 100s of years of history, secluded from the nearby roads and town. Linked to the Christian mission to pictish Kings.
Kevin Thomson (2 years ago)
Restenneth Priory is well worth a visit. Fantastic example of hidden history. 100s of years of history, secluded from the nearby roads and town. Linked to the Christian mission to pictish Kings.
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