Dunblane Cathedral is the larger of the two Church of Scotland parish churches serving Dunblane. The lower half of the tower is pre-Romanesque from the 11th century, and was originally free-standing, with an upper part added in the 15th century. Most of the rest of the building is Gothic, from the 13th century. The building was restored by Rowand Anderson from 1889–93.

The Cathedral was once the seat of the bishops of Dunblane, until the abolition of bishops after the Glorious Revolution in 1689. There are remains of the vaults of the episcopal palace to the south of the cathedral. Technically, it is no longer a cathedral, as there are no bishops in the Church of Scotland, which is a Presbyterian denomination. After the abolition of prelacy, the choir became the parish church but the nave fell out of use, and its roof had fallen in by about 1600.

It contains the graves of Margaret Drummond of Stobhall, a mistress of King James IV of Scotland and her two sisters, all said to have been poisoned.

The building is largely 13th century in date, though it incorporates an originally freestanding bell-tower (like the example at Muthill) of 11th century date on its south side. This tower was increased in height in the 15th century, a change clearly visible in the colour of the stonework, and in the late Gothic style of the upper storey's windows.

The choir is unaisled, but has a long vaulted chamber which served as chapter house and sacristy on its north side. The choir contains the mural tomb of the Cathedral's founder, Bishop Clement. Many of the 15th century choir stalls, which have carved misericords (including one with an unusual depiction of a bat) are preserved within the choir. Further, more elaborate, canopied stalls are preserved at the west end of the nave. Dunblane has the largest surviving collection of medieval Scottish ecclesiastical woodwork after King's College Chapel, Aberdeen. Some detached fragments are displayed in the town's museum.

The cathedral was restored in the late 19th century under the control of Rev Alexander Ritchie DD, who commissioned architect Robert Rowand Anderson to oversee the works, with these works completed by Sir Robert Lorimer in 1912.

Preserved within the arcaded nave are two early Christian stones, a cross-slab and a possible architectural frieze, survivals from an early medieval church on the same site, founded by or dedicated to the 'Blane' whose name is commemorated in the name of the town.

Dunblane Cathedral churchyard contains two war graves, including that of William Stirling, a gunner in the Royal Marine Artillery during World War I.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Keith Richards (6 months ago)
Lovely Cathedral well worth a visit. The guide on the door very informative
James 0000 (6 months ago)
apparently singing "jesus christ is a lie, praise be to allah" while throwing meetbals at people, is not acceptable conduct for a church
Chris Chris (11 months ago)
Rare you can take a walk up to the heights of the upper galleries to get close up views of the magnificent stained glass and look down to the altar below. An archaeological treasure.
Ian McAusland (12 months ago)
Called City of Dunblane but is quite small. Cathedral was closed on my visit lovely building. There is a great High Street full of shops, definitely worth a visit.
Dave Latham (13 months ago)
A beautiful building and a lovely but too formal service. A very interesting and well-delivered sermon by a personable and smiling trainee minister whose name is Josh. He has an engaging manner and spoke with conviction. A variety of hymns but the congregation could hardly be heard because their voices were lost in the huge building and were overpowered by the far too loud organ. Even the choir could hardly be heard and it was almost screened off and isolated from the congregation. Not as welcoming as most churches and the congregation could be warmer.
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