Ardoch Roman Fort is an archaeological site just outside the village of Braco. At Ardoch are the remains of a Roman fort and several marching camps which included a signal tower. Part of the Roman Gask Ridge, it is said to be one of the most complete Roman camps in Britain, and is one of the best-preserved series of Roman military earthworks in the whole Empire.

The remains consist of grass-covered earthworks, and are considered among the best preserved Roman earthworks in Britain. The site, which has a complex history, comprises two intersecting forts. The earliest fort is believed to be associated with the campaigns of Agricola (1st century). The later fort was apparently reconstructed within two outer ditches so that this later fort was protected by five ditches on both the east and north sides.

The field to the north is the remnant of a large annexe. Archaeology has demonstrated the existence of a watch-tower (or signal tower) and at least six overlapping marching camps to the north and northeast.

The site was reused in the medieval period when a chapel was built near the centre of the fort. The remains of the graveyard enclosure and the site of the chapel are the only archaeological remains which are visible within the fort.

A hoard of Roman silver coins was found 4 miles north of Ardoch in 1671. At that time, Lord Drummond wrote that the ditches were deep enough to hide a man on horseback. Other trenches to the north east had been damaged by cultivation against his grandfather's orders.

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Founded: 1st century AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Tom McCall (11 months ago)
Impressive, the defensive ditches give a good idea as to how effective it was in the case of attack.
Patrick Patullo (2 years ago)
Interesting, but needs better signage to locate site and some historical detail would enhance the site!
Robert Sizer (2 years ago)
Nice Roman site. Hard to see on ground but good aerial photograph on signage on way onto town.
Lucinda Hare (2 years ago)
Awesome unspoilt example of a Roman fort defensive earthworks and what appears to be the huge outline of a temporary legionary fortress nearby. Wherever you stand you can see the legionaries handiwork, stand where they stood. Too often robbed out or dug up, built on or vandalized this fort is magical for anyone passionate about Rome
Original Darrell (2 years ago)
Good if you have dogs as they can run around. Not much space to park a car though to get to.
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