Dundas Castle is a 15th-century castle, with substantial 19th-century additions by William Burn, in the Dalmeny parish of West Lothian. The home of the Dundas family since the Middle Ages, it was sold in the late 19th century and is currently the residence of politician and businessman Sir Jack Stewart-Clark.

In the 11th century, the lands of Dundas, along with other land in Lothian, were granted by King Malcolm Canmore to Gospatrick, the earl of Northumbria, who had come north to escape William the Conqueror. The lands of Dundas passed to his great-grandson Waldeve, who granted them to his kinsman Helias in a charter dating from around 1180. Helias took his surname from his lands, becoming the first of the Dundas family. The Dundases and their cadets would later come to own much of Mid and West Lothian.

In 1416, James Dundas obtained a licence from the Duke of Albany (then the effective ruler of Scotland) to build a keep. This keep was extended in 1436, making it into an L-plan. The Keep served both as a home in times of peace and a fortress in times of war.

Oliver Cromwell is known to have stayed at Dundas Castle around the time of the Battle of Dunbar in 1650. A statue of him remains standing outside the Keep.

In 1818, James Dundas had the 17th century portion of the building pulled down and rebuilt in a Tudor-Gothic style by the renowned architect William Burn. Burn also designed many churches and this influence is visible throughout the building. Burn's designs for the main state rooms allow for huge windows that look out on to lawns and parkland outside.

The building and extensive gardens had cost so much to construct that the Dundases were forced to sell the castle and lands in 1875. The buyer was William Russell. It was again sold in 1899, when it was bought along with five farms and 1,500 acres of agricultural land by Stewart Clark, the owner of a Renfrewshire textile company and a respected philanthropist. Clark's son, John, took the double-barrelled surname 'Stewart-Clark' in honour of his father, and he was made a Baronet in 1918.

During the Second World War, Dundas Castle served as the headquarters for protecting the Forth Bridge. Since 1995, the castle's owner has been Sir Jack Stewart-Clark, the great-grandson of Stewart Clark. Stewart-Clark was a Member of the European Parliament between 1979 and 1999.

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Dalmeny, United Kingdom
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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vic Dobbie (11 months ago)
Was there for my granddaughter wedding and everything was just wonderful loved everything about it,the staff did everything for you and nothing was to much trouble,
Vic Dobbie (11 months ago)
Was there for my granddaughter wedding and everything was just wonderful loved everything about it,the staff did everything for you and nothing was to much trouble,
K Alexi (12 months ago)
Beautiful location and setting let down by pretentious, snooty staff. Castle venues in Scotland are not rare, yet they are priced as if they are. 'The Pavilion' is nothing more than a glorified marquee, and a tired looking and shabby marquee at that. Shop around, for the money this place charges you can have your pick of any venue in Scotland.
K Alexi (12 months ago)
Beautiful location and setting let down by pretentious, snooty staff. Castle venues in Scotland are not rare, yet they are priced as if they are. 'The Pavilion' is nothing more than a glorified marquee, and a tired looking and shabby marquee at that. Shop around, for the money this place charges you can have your pick of any venue in Scotland.
Robert Clelland (Rab) (16 months ago)
One of the places we stopped today. Duncan Castle. Unfortunately it no opened. Or to the public. Not sure which. It had lots of gee gees. Horses. Lovely place for a walk, even a slow drive through. Some places you can't get into just now. The castle looks lovely. Wouldn't mind going in to see it. There is also a golf course very near by.
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