Cointreau Museum

Angers, France

Cointreau’s history began in 1849 when Adolphe and Edouard-Jean Cointreau founded a distillery in Angers to create spirits using local fruits. This was the starting point of 150 years of success story build step by step by four generations of the Cointreau family.

The Carré Cointreau, (the name of the distillery and museum) is open to the public for tours. While Cointreau is dedicated to keep their special recipe a secret to outsiders, visitors to the distillery can still tour many areas where the orange liqueur is made and visit the museum, where you can learn more about the history of Cointreau. Visitors also get a free Cointreau cocktail at the end of the tour.

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Founded: 1849
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Naylor (3 months ago)
Multiple free drinks of Cointreau, visit where they dump orange peels into beetroot alcohol and boil it. Discover how they water it down with water, hopefully not from the Loire, and then sweeten it up with beet sugar. Watch longingly as they pack crates of Remy Martin XO cognac and wonder what could have been. Find out how hard liquor was marketed to the drunken poor by turning a sad clown caricature into a happy one carrying hard liquor. Worth the trip.
Fred de Cruz (6 months ago)
Interesting to visit there is a charge I cannot remember how much but more than £5 most of the tours are in French
Richard Jenkins (7 months ago)
Excellent. A great team day. A trip around the distillery followed by a history of the brand. At the end a free taste and a boutique.
steve howie (9 months ago)
Really good... one of the best such tours I've done
Bruno Alves (11 months ago)
All personal are friendly, easy to found and load or unloading cistern.
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