Château de Brézé

Brézé, France

Château de Brézé is a small, dry-moated castle located in Brézé, near Saumur. The château was transformed during the 16th and the 19th centuries. The current structure is Renaissance in style yet retains medieval elements including a drawbridge and a 12th century troglodytic basement. Today, it is the residence of descendants of the ancient lords. The château is a listed ancient monument originally dating from 1060. A range of wines are produced at the château which has 30 hectares of vineyards.

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Address

Le Château, Brézé, France
See all sites in Brézé

Details

Founded: 1060
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

jason daury (48 days ago)
Wonderful visit. Highly recommend if you are in the area.
Did W (5 months ago)
One of the best places to visit in the region. Amazing castle, steeped in history. We enjoyed a picnic in the grounds before exploring the main castle and the subterranean tunnels which are fascinating. Sampled the wines they make (we saw them harvesting in the vineyards on the way in) and had to get a bottle or two to enjoy later.
Liese De Vos (6 months ago)
very enjoyable place to visit. most information is both French and English. ideal on a hot day. the caves are cool in temperature so bring a jacket.
Jane Sumner (6 months ago)
Fascinating place to visit, although there is very little to see in the " upstairs" Chateau. If you are tall be aware that you will have to stoop in some places but the history and caves make it a very interesting place to visit. Although when we visited in June/ July there were a lot of biting insects around so go prepared.
William Stephens (9 months ago)
Fascinating Chateaux with nice reception staff who spoke English (And French of course). Chateaux is on many levels, with the house having baroque interest including an interesting bishops bathroom!. The underground area is a troglodyte maze with areas in the deep moat to explore as well. The whole place was very well laid out with explanations in French and English.
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