Musée Jean Lurcát

Angers, France

The Gothic masterpiece was founded in 1175 by Henry II of England and it functioned as a hospital until 1875. A reconstruction of the dispensary occupies one corner of the Salle des Malades, and a chapel and 12th century cloisters can be reached through a door at the end of the gallery. 

Today the building houses the works of the 20th century artist Jean Lurcát and many of his vivid tapestries.

References:
  • Eyewitness Travel Guide: Loire Valley. 2007

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Details

Founded: 1175
Category: Museums in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vijay Bhardwaj (2 years ago)
Very calm atmosphere for the display of a very disturbing subject. A must visit for anyone who loves art but dislikes the inhumanity in humankind.
Michelle Chaillou (2 years ago)
Surrounded by a grand n beautiful garden. Will be back for the next visit into the musée to experience "la tapisserie".
Madalina Blaga (2 years ago)
Carpet museum in an ancient hospital. Nice ambiance, impressive carpets
Elisa Perrini (3 years ago)
Interesting! I didn't know the modern art of tapestry: the colors of the art works are absolutely vibrant and to think about all the work that went into making them is almost overwhelming. The building itself is a pleasure to the eye with the surrounding garden, shame that the chapel and the cloister are temporarily closed. Spent there about 1 hour and half.
Elisa Perrini (3 years ago)
Interesting! I didn't know the modern art of tapestry: the colors of the art works are absolutely vibrant and to think about all the work that went into making them is almost overwhelming. The building itself is a pleasure to the eye with the surrounding garden, shame that the chapel and the cloister are temporarily closed. Spent there about 1 hour and half.
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