Lieto Old Castle

Lieto, Finland

There has been a fortified hill in Lieto (“Liedon Vanhalinna”) from the prehistoric age. According to excavations, the castle has been in use in the Late Bronze Age (1500-500 BC), in Middle Iron Age (500-700 AD, contested) and in the Middle Ages up to the end of the 14th century, when it was replaced by the "new castle" in Turku harbour.

During the first crusade (ca. 1155) to Finland Swedish army fought heavy battles against pagan Finnish people to conquer Lieto castle hill. After the victory Swedish fortified hill with stone and brick walls to defence the new city of Turku and christianity against Finnish and Novgorodians. There were several buildings, outer walls and a watch tower in the hill. When the Turku castle was completed Lieto castle lost the military value and was left to decay. The latest record of the existing castle date from the year 1438.

In the 1956 private landowners donated Lieto hill to the University of Turku, which has used hill for the archeological training. Nowadays there are some few ruins left of castle walls and buildings.

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: ca. 1000-1370
Category: Ruins in Finland
Historical period: Iron Age (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Venkat Subramaniam (17 months ago)
A place with an awesome view at the hilltop.
Imran Hafeez (19 months ago)
Nice place to visit with family or alone. Quite surroundings
Oleg Androniuk (2 years ago)
Wanderfull enytime!
Rupesh Chaudhary (2 years ago)
Excellet place to visit.
Guillaume Jacquemet (3 years ago)
Great place for a meeting or a karanka !
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Montparnasse Cemetery

Montparnasse Cemetery was created from three farms in 1824. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.

Montparnasse cemetery is the burial place of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also many graves of foreigners who have made France their home, as well as monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris.

The cemetery is divided by Rue Émile Richard. The small section is usually referred to as the small cemetery (petit cimetière) and the large section as the big cemetery (grand cimetière).

Although Baudelaire is buried in this cemetery (division 6), there is also a cenotaph to him (between division 26 and 27). Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction.