St Mary's Church

Turku, Finland

The St. Mary's Church is a medieval stone church located in Maaria. There are no records as to when the present church was built, but the work was probably started in the mid or late 15th century. According to Markus Hiekkanen, the church was probably built in the 1440s. On the basis of the style of the closets, the gables were constructed about 50 years later.

There are medieval limestone paintings on the walls, which are not common to other places in Finland. The most valuable artefacts are the wooden alter cabinet and large altarpiece depicting Christ on the cross.

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Connie Setala Joslin said 6 years ago
My grandfather, Pastor Alpo Setala, was the Pastor of this church during the years approximately 1930 - 1947. He then moved my father and the rest of the family to the United States.


Details

Founded: 1440
Category: Religious sites in Finland
Historical period: Middle Ages (Finland)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marko Petteri Tuomainen (3 years ago)
Very fascinating church! Here you can almost touch medieval times.
MickishDK (3 years ago)
Very interesting place to walk around in, alot of old stones and history to be read.
Anna Gąciarz (3 years ago)
This is amazing place to visit in Turku! The whole complex: Romanesque church, surrounding graveyard, park with old trees and vicarage are very well preserved. There is also a war memorial place with soldier graves who died in 1944. There are so many interesting details to photograph in here that you should book at least 30 min for your visit :-)
Harry Rostedt (3 years ago)
Historic church
Pauli Sundgren (4 years ago)
Karun kaunis Maarian kirkko on eräs maamme vanhimmista keskiajalla rakennetuista kivikirkoista. Joidenkin tietojen mukaan se olisi rakennettu jo 1300-luvulla.
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