Täby Church was built during the latter half of the 13th century. It was first constructed as a square hall. In mid 14th century a vestry was added and about 100 years later the church porch was built. During the second half of the 15th century, the flat wooden ceiling was replaced by a vaulted ceiling. The altarpiece dates from the 1470s.

The church is best known as one of the churches with mural paintings by Albertus Pictor (died 1511). The paintings in the ceiling were made in the 1480s and were never, as many of his other works, covered by white paint. The paintings include a picture of a man playing chess with Death, a motif that inspired Ingmar Bergman in his making the movie The Seventh Seal. The main inspiration for the paintings was Biblia Pauperum, a collection of events from the Holy Bible. The pulpit is from the 1630s and was originally placed in the chapel of the former Castle of Stockholm.

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Address

Kyrkvägen 7, Täby, Sweden
See all sites in Täby

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Enrique Iglesias López (2 years ago)
Sitio impresionante en su interior completamente decorado con pinturas. En su construcción se aprovechó una de las muchas runas de la zona para colocarla en sus muros, afortunadamente, aún es posible verla porque la han dejado descubierta.
Amadeus Khassebaf (2 years ago)
Fridfull stället...
Birgitta Rindfelt (3 years ago)
Gräsmattorna är under all kritik. Varför klipper ni inte? ? Har aldrig upplevt så här för ca 5år sen sköttes det. Vet inte varför ni glömt bort att klippa ner det
Claes Mogren (4 years ago)
Really old church with a beautiful painted ceiling.
B Nagy (5 years ago)
One of the most peaceful places on earth.
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