Golden Gate (Złota Brama) is one of the most notable tourist attractions of the Gdánsk. It was raised in 1612–1614 in place of the 13th century Gothic gate. It forms a part of the old city fortifications. The gate was designed by architect Abraham van den Blocke and was constructed by Jan Strakowski. The architectural style of the gate is Dutch manierism. Next to it is the late-gothic building of the Brotherhood of St.George. Both sides of the gate have attiques, with figures symbolizing citizen's qualities. They were designed in 1648 by Jeremias Falck, and reconstructed in 1878 due to the originals being damaged by time and climate.

Destroyed in World War II, it was rebuilt in 1957. The original German inscription has recently been restored: Es müsse wohl gehen denen, die dich lieben. Es müsse Friede sein inwendig in deinen Mauern und Glück in deinen Palästen (Psalm 122).

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Nina said 4 years ago
Golden Gare is on of the undeniable symbol of Gdansk. Nevertheless, we can find there much more places and monuments worth of attention. Certainly veru interesting place is located on Marina, restaurant Szafarnia 10. Here you can spend great time with friends and enjoy the Moltawa River form glass terrace . Served there cod cheeks or filet of duck are delicious.


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Founded: 1612–1614
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User Reviews

Karan Zakrzewski-Sharma (16 months ago)
Beautiful and marks the start of Gdańsk's most representative street
Oliver Ward (2 years ago)
Gdansk old town, nice atmosphere in the lead up to Christmas.
Oliwia Biros (2 years ago)
The Golden Gate marks the beginning of the Long Street and is a main attraction of the Royal Route. It is also a famous meeting point. Gate was built in the 17th century as part of the old city fortifications. On top of the gate there are eight figures representing different qualities that should be exercised by the citizens.
Brett Gottfried (2 years ago)
Beautiful architecture on this gate. It leads to the entrance of one of the main streets in Old Town. The green is color is very different than most other gates around here
Phibappé Tengelgren (2 years ago)
An iconic architecture in the old town. One of the many gates in Gdansk. When you understand the history of it, it will not just purely a “gate” for taking pictures It was built in the 17th century with the Dutch mannerism style. It was rebuilt after being destroyed by Soviet shelling in WWII.
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