Built by the Teutonic Knights in 1350, the Great Mill with its rising tiled roof is the grandest civil construction in Gdańsk. Until 1356 when the Radunia Canal was built, the mill was powered by slaves turning 18 huge wheels. It was the largest industrial plant in Europe during the Middle Ages and functioned until the end of WWII. Unfortunately, this treasure has since been turned into a shopping centre. At least there's a small exhibition of old equipment from the mill. The surrounding grain and flour stores, dating to 1400, are home to a few small shops.

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    Founded: 1350
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    Михаил Смирнов (13 months ago)
    Цегляний млин на штучному острівці на каналі Радуні, побудований у 1350 році тевтонцями. Це одна з найбільших промислових споруд середньовіччя, працювала за первісним призначенням аж до другої світової війни. Млин мав спочатку 12, а потім 18 колес. В приміщенні знаходилися також склад та пекарня.
    Bogumiła Trojanowska (2 years ago)
    Nieczynne wewnątrz na zewnątrz warte obejrzenia
    MrBashmat (2 years ago)
    Великий млин, побудований ще в середині XIV століття лицарями Тевтонського ордену. В ці часи він був найбільшим сільськогосподарським будинком середньовічного міста.
    Tomasz Puchalski (2 years ago)
    Kiedyś jedna z pierwszych galerii handlowych w Gdańsku. Obecnie pusto. Ma być tam przeniesione Muzeum Bursztynu, które obecnie mieści się w Katowni.
    SaMeh ARCOMINDLW (2 years ago)
    Beautiful building, but nothing to do there other than taking photos from outside.
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