The Old Cemetery Of Pitkäniemi

Nokia, Finland

The cemetery was built for the near Pitkäniemi mental hospital. Total of 426 patients were buried to the cemetery between 1902-1964 before it was abandoded. Because the human dignity of mental patients was not very high 100 years ago, only small tombstones or no tombstone att all were added to graves. The chapel was burned down more than half century ago.

There are also some remains of old trenches near the cemetery. Those were built by the Russian army during the First World War to defence Finland against the potential occupation of Germany.

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Details

Founded: 1902-1964
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

More Information

www.servut.us
www.pe.tut.fi

Rating

3.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Helena Ahonen (2 years ago)
Quiet beautiful place in summer.
Ulla Rapio (3 years ago)
The cemeteries are well-kept, beautiful, garden-like, as is the Old Cemetery in Hämeenkyrö.
Minna-Kristiina Hallikainen (4 years ago)
Old but well maintained cemetery
ARTO PIIPPO (4 years ago)
Lovely chapel. This place has a very long history.
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